Vergence-mediated changes in Listing's plane do not occur in an eye with superior oblique palsy

Americo A. Migliaccio, Phillip D. Cremer, Swee T. Aw, G. Michael Halmagyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE. As a normal subject looks from far to near, Listing's plane rotates temporally in each eye. Since Listing's plane relates to the control of torsional eye position, mostly by the oblique eye muscles, the current study was conducted to test the hypothesis that a patient with isolated superior oblique palsy would have a problem controlling Listing's plane. METHOD. Using the three-dimensional scleral search coil technique, binocular Listing's plane was measured in four patients with congenital and in four patients with acquired unilateral superior oblique palsy during far- (94 cm) and near- (15 cm) viewing. The results were compared to previously published Listing's plane data collected under exactly the same conditions from 10 normal subjects. RESULTS. In patients with unilateral superior oblique palsy, either congenital or acquired, Listing's plane in the normal eye rotated temporally on near-viewing, as in normal subjects, while in the paretic eye it failed to do so. In patients with acquired superior oblique palsy, Listing's plane was already rotated temporally during far-viewing and failed to rotate any farther on near-viewing, whereas in patients with congenital superior oblique palsy Listing's plane in the paretic eye was oriented normally during far-viewing and failed to rotate any farther on near-viewing. CONCLUSIONS. These results suggest that the superior oblique muscle, at least in part, is responsible for the temporal rotation of Listing's plane that occurs in normal subjects on convergence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3043-3047
Number of pages5
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume45
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Paralysis
Oculomotor Muscles
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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Vergence-mediated changes in Listing's plane do not occur in an eye with superior oblique palsy. / Migliaccio, Americo A.; Cremer, Phillip D.; Aw, Swee T.; Halmagyi, G. Michael.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 45, No. 9, 09.2004, p. 3043-3047.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Migliaccio, Americo A. ; Cremer, Phillip D. ; Aw, Swee T. ; Halmagyi, G. Michael. / Vergence-mediated changes in Listing's plane do not occur in an eye with superior oblique palsy. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2004 ; Vol. 45, No. 9. pp. 3043-3047.
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