Ventricular inversion and tricuspid atresia (VITA complex): Long survival without surgical treatment

Henry D. Tazelaar, G. William Moore, Grover M. Hutchins

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Five patients with ventricular inversion, corrected transposition of the great arteries, and atresia of the left-sided atrioventricular (tricuspid) valve have been observed. Three patients died in infancy, two had large interatrial communications, one with an early stage of arterial-type hypertensive pulmonary vascular disease, and the third patient had a very small interatrial communication and severe cyanosis. The other two patients survived into adulthood; both had small interatrial communications, and one had severe venous-type hypertensive pulmonary vascular disease. The longer survival of the two patients is attributed to a balance between resistance and blood flow in the pulmonary circulation influenced by the size of the interatrial communication.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)187-191
    Number of pages5
    JournalPediatric Cardiology
    Volume6
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1986

    Fingerprint

    Tricuspid Atresia
    Communication
    Survival
    Vascular Diseases
    Lung Diseases
    Therapeutics
    Transposition of Great Vessels
    Cyanosis
    Pulmonary Circulation
    Tricuspid Valve

    Keywords

    • Transposition of the great arteries
    • Tricuspid atresia
    • Ventricular inversion
    • Vita complex

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    Cite this

    Ventricular inversion and tricuspid atresia (VITA complex) : Long survival without surgical treatment. / Tazelaar, Henry D.; Moore, G. William; Hutchins, Grover M.

    In: Pediatric Cardiology, Vol. 6, No. 4, 12.1986, p. 187-191.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Tazelaar, Henry D. ; Moore, G. William ; Hutchins, Grover M. / Ventricular inversion and tricuspid atresia (VITA complex) : Long survival without surgical treatment. In: Pediatric Cardiology. 1986 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 187-191.
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