Ventilatory function in young adults and dietary antioxidant intake

Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Hugo Amigo, Patricia Bustos, Ioannis Bakolis, Roberto J. Rona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dietary antioxidants may protect against poor ventilatory function. We assessed the relation between ventilatory function and antioxidant components of diet in young Chileans. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and the ratio FEV1/FVC were measured in 1232 adults aged 22–28 years, using a Vitalograph device. Dietary intake was ascertained with a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) designed for this study, from which nutrient and flavonoid intakes were estimated. Dietary patterns were derived with Principal Component Analysis (PCA). After controlling for potential confounders, dietary intake of total catechins was positively associated with FVC (Regression coefficient (RC) of highest vs. lowest quintile of intake 0.07; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.15; p per trend 0.006). Total fruit intake was related to FVC (RC of highest vs. lowest quintile 0.08; 95% CI 0.003 to 0.15; p per trend 0.02). Intake of omega 3 fatty acids was associated with a higher FEV1 (RC for highest vs. lowest quintile 0.08; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.15 L; p per trend 0.02) and with FVC 0.08 (RC in highest vs. lowest quintile of intake 0.08, 95% CI 0.001 to 0.16; p per trend 0.04). Our results show that fresh fruits, flavonoids, and omega 3 fatty acids may contribute to maintain ventilatory function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2879-2896
Number of pages18
JournalNutrients
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2015

Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • FFQ
  • FLavonoids
  • General population
  • Lung function
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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