Vascular endothelial growth factor-induced retinal permeability is mediated by protein kinase C in vivo and suppressed by an orally effective β-isoform-selective inhibitor

Lloyd Paul Aiello, Sven Erik Bursell, Allen Clermont, Elia Duh, Hidehiro Ishii, Chikako Takagi, Fumi Mori, Thomas A. Ciulla, Kirk Ways, Michael Jirousek, Lois E.H. Smith, George L. King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Increased vascular permeability and excessive neovascularization are the hallmarks of endothelial dysfunction, which can lead to diabetic macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in the eye. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important mediator of ocular neovascularization and a known vasopermeability factor in nonocular tissues. In these studies, we demonstrate that intravitreal injection of VEGF rapidly activates protein kinase C (PKC) in the retina at concentrations observed clinically, inducing membrane translocation of PKC isoforms α, β11, and δ and >threefold increases in retinal vasopermeability in vivo. The effect of VEGF on retinal vascular permeability appears to be mediated predominantly by the β-isoform of PKC with >95% inhibition of VEGF-induced permeability by intravitreal or oral administration of a PKC β-isoform-selective inhibitor that did not inhibit histamine-mediated effects. These studies represent the first direct demonstration that VEGF can increase intraocular vascular permeability through activation of PKC in vivo and suggest that oral pharmacological therapies involving PKC β-isoform-selective inhibitors may prove efficacious for the treatment of VEGF-associated ocular disorders such as diabetic retinopathy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1473-1480
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes
Volume46
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Vascular endothelial growth factor-induced retinal permeability is mediated by protein kinase C in vivo and suppressed by an orally effective β-isoform-selective inhibitor'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this