Vandetanib, designed to inhibit VEGFR2 and EGFR signaling, had no clinical activity as monotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer and no detectable modulation of VEGFR2

Christina M. Annunziata, Amanda J. Walker, Lori Minasian, Minshu Yu, Herbert Kotz, Bradford J. Wood, Katherine Calvo, Peter Choyke, Daniel Kimm, Seth M. Steinberg, Elise C. Kohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate clinical activity and target modulation of vandetanib in women with recurrent ovarian cancer. Experimental Design: A phase II trial of orally administered vandetanib 300 mg daily was designed to include analyses of target inhibition through paired biopsies and dynamic imaging. Core 18-gauge needle biopsies and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were obtained before initiation of therapy and 6 weeks into therapy. Biopsy samples were subjected to reverse-phase protein lysate array endpoint analysis. Cytokine concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serially collected plasma samples. Results: Twelve patients entered the study, and accrual was terminated in the first stage because of lack of response or disease stabilization beyond 6 months. Adverse events included rash, diarrhea, and prolonged QT interval corrected for heart rate, but not hypertension. Exploratory analyses showed that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation was reduced in the eight paired biopsy sets obtained; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 phosphorylation was not consistently affected nor were dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI permeability and flow parameters. Serial plasma VEGF concentrations were variable and did not significantly change in the 11 patients assessed. Conclusions: Vandetanib 300 mg daily monotherapy had no significant clinical benefit in this disease setting. Proteomic analysis of paired biopsies detected both phosphorylated-EGFR and phosphorylated-VEGF receptor-2 in ovarian tumor tissue, but only phosphorylated-EGFR was measurably inhibited by vandetanib.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)664-672
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Vandetanib, designed to inhibit VEGFR2 and EGFR signaling, had no clinical activity as monotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer and no detectable modulation of VEGFR2'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this