Vancomycin resistance, esp, and strain relatedness: A 1-year study of enterococcal bacteremia

S. M. Harrington, T. L. Ross, Kelly Gebo, W. G. Merz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The prevalence of esp, a gene associated with infection-derived and outbreak strains, in enterococcal blood isolates from 2002 was determined. Fifty-five of 137 (40.1%) Enterococcus faecalis isolates, 30 of 58 (51.7%) E. faecium isolates, 1 of 1 E. raffinosus isolate, 0 of 4 E. gallinarum isolates, and 0 of 1 E. casseliflavus isolate were positive. esp wasn't associated with vancomycin resistance (VR) or clinical service. VR E. faecium isolates were less genetically diverse than vancomycin-susceptible strains. A large cluster of VR isolates, belonging to esp-positive E. faecium, was revealed. These data support the hypothesis that esp and VR may contribute to dissemination of particular clones.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5895-5898
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume42
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

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Vancomycin Resistance
Bacteremia
Enterococcus faecalis
Vancomycin
Disease Outbreaks
Clone Cells
Infection
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology

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Vancomycin resistance, esp, and strain relatedness : A 1-year study of enterococcal bacteremia. / Harrington, S. M.; Ross, T. L.; Gebo, Kelly; Merz, W. G.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 42, No. 12, 12.2004, p. 5895-5898.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harrington, S. M. ; Ross, T. L. ; Gebo, Kelly ; Merz, W. G. / Vancomycin resistance, esp, and strain relatedness : A 1-year study of enterococcal bacteremia. In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2004 ; Vol. 42, No. 12. pp. 5895-5898.
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