Validity of faculty and resident global assessment of medical students' clinical knowledge during their pediatrics clerkship

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Medical knowledge is one of six core competencies in medicine. Medical student assessments should be valid and reliable. We assessed the relationship between faculty and resident global assessment of pediatric medical student knowledge and performance on a standardized test in medical knowledge. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study of medical students on a pediatric clerkship in academic year 2008-2009 at one academic health center. Faculty and residents rated students' clinical knowledge on a 5-point Likert scale. The inter-rater reliability of clinical knowledge ratings was assessed by calculating the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for residents' ratings, faculty ratings, and both rating types combined. Convergent validity between clinical knowledge ratings and scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) clinical subject examination in pediatrics was assessed with Pearson product moment correlation correction and the coefficient of the determination. Results: There was moderate agreement for global clinical knowledge ratings by faculty and moderate agreement for ratings by residents. The agreement was also moderate when faculty and resident ratings were combined. Global ratings of clinical knowledge had high convergent validity with pediatric examination scores when students were rated by both residents and faculty. Conclusions: Our findings provide evidence for convergent validity of global assessment of medical students' clinical knowledge with NBME subject examination scores in pediatrics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)138-141
Number of pages4
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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Medical Students
Pediatrics
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Students
Cross-Sectional Studies
Medicine
Health

Keywords

  • assessment
  • clinical clerkship
  • medical education
  • medical student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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title = "Validity of faculty and resident global assessment of medical students' clinical knowledge during their pediatrics clerkship",
abstract = "Objective: Medical knowledge is one of six core competencies in medicine. Medical student assessments should be valid and reliable. We assessed the relationship between faculty and resident global assessment of pediatric medical student knowledge and performance on a standardized test in medical knowledge. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study of medical students on a pediatric clerkship in academic year 2008-2009 at one academic health center. Faculty and residents rated students' clinical knowledge on a 5-point Likert scale. The inter-rater reliability of clinical knowledge ratings was assessed by calculating the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for residents' ratings, faculty ratings, and both rating types combined. Convergent validity between clinical knowledge ratings and scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) clinical subject examination in pediatrics was assessed with Pearson product moment correlation correction and the coefficient of the determination. Results: There was moderate agreement for global clinical knowledge ratings by faculty and moderate agreement for ratings by residents. The agreement was also moderate when faculty and resident ratings were combined. Global ratings of clinical knowledge had high convergent validity with pediatric examination scores when students were rated by both residents and faculty. Conclusions: Our findings provide evidence for convergent validity of global assessment of medical students' clinical knowledge with NBME subject examination scores in pediatrics.",
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author = "Dudas, {Robert A} and Jorie Colbert-Getz and Seth Goldstein and Michael Barone",
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AU - Goldstein, Seth

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AB - Objective: Medical knowledge is one of six core competencies in medicine. Medical student assessments should be valid and reliable. We assessed the relationship between faculty and resident global assessment of pediatric medical student knowledge and performance on a standardized test in medical knowledge. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study of medical students on a pediatric clerkship in academic year 2008-2009 at one academic health center. Faculty and residents rated students' clinical knowledge on a 5-point Likert scale. The inter-rater reliability of clinical knowledge ratings was assessed by calculating the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for residents' ratings, faculty ratings, and both rating types combined. Convergent validity between clinical knowledge ratings and scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) clinical subject examination in pediatrics was assessed with Pearson product moment correlation correction and the coefficient of the determination. Results: There was moderate agreement for global clinical knowledge ratings by faculty and moderate agreement for ratings by residents. The agreement was also moderate when faculty and resident ratings were combined. Global ratings of clinical knowledge had high convergent validity with pediatric examination scores when students were rated by both residents and faculty. Conclusions: Our findings provide evidence for convergent validity of global assessment of medical students' clinical knowledge with NBME subject examination scores in pediatrics.

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