Validation of three geolocation strategies for health-facility attendees for research and public health surveillance in a rural setting in western Kenya

G. H. Stresman, J. C. Stevenson, C. Owaga, E. Marube, C. Anyango, C. Drakeley, T. Bousema, J. Cox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Understanding the spatial distribution of disease is critical for effective disease control. Where formal address networks do not exist, tracking spatial patterns of clinical disease is difficult. Geolocation strategies were tested at rural health facilities in western Kenya. Methods included geocoding residence by head of compound, participatory mapping and recording the self-reported nearest landmark. Geocoding was able to locate 72.9% [95% confidence interval (CI) 67.7-77.6] of individuals to within 250 m of the true compound location. The participatory mapping exercise was able to correctly locate 82.0% of compounds (95% CI 78.9-84.8) to a 2 × 2.5 km area with a 500 m buffer. The self-reported nearest landmark was able to locate 78.1% (95% CI 73.8-82.1) of compounds to the correct catchment area. These strategies tested provide options for quickly obtaining spatial information on individuals presenting at health facilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1978-1989
Number of pages12
JournalEpidemiology and infection
Volume142
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2014

Keywords

  • Infectious disease epidemiology
  • spatial modelling
  • surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Infectious Diseases

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