Validation of the self-administered version of the international Restless Legs Syndrome study group severity rating scale – The sIRLS

International RLS Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: The International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) has developed the IRLS (International Restless Legs Syndrome Severity Scale) and validated it as a clinician/researcher administered scale to be used when both patient and examiner are present. The IRLSSG recognized the need for a self-completing scale that can be used economically in clinical practice and in large population-based studies. In this study the validity and the reliability of the IRLS as a self-administered scale (sIRLS) is assessed. Methods: Established RLS patients were recruited by eight centers in four countries and consented to participate in this study. The validity of the sIRLS was assessed by patients completing the sIRLS before a clinician administered the IRLS. The reliability of the sIRLS was assessed by patients completing the sIRLS again, two weeks after the first one, provided no change had occurred. Results: Overall, 173 patients were recruited and 164 of them were included in the analyses. The sIRLS showed satisfactory scaling assumptions and no relevant floor or ceiling effect. One factor explained 61.3% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha was 0.93 and the item homogeneity index was 0.59. Intraclass correlation coefficient between the sIRLS and the IRLS was 0.94. The sIRLS standard error of measurement was 3.61 (½ SD at baseline = 4.11). The results mostly overlapped those of the IRLS analyzed in parallel. Discussion: The sIRLS is a reliable, valid and precise instrument that showed tight association with the IRLS. These findings support the use of the sIRLS for self-evaluation of RLS severity. The responses obtained on the sIRLS and the IRLS scale varied slightly. Therefore, we recommend that either the sIRLS or the IRLS scale be used as the only scale for serial measures over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-100
Number of pages7
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume54
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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Restless Legs Syndrome
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Reproducibility of Results
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • Patient completed
  • Restless Legs Syndrome
  • RLS symptoms
  • Self-administered
  • Severity scale
  • Validity/reliability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Validation of the self-administered version of the international Restless Legs Syndrome study group severity rating scale – The sIRLS. / International RLS Study Group.

In: Sleep Medicine, Vol. 54, 01.02.2019, p. 94-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Validation of the self-administered version of the international Restless Legs Syndrome study group severity rating scale – The sIRLS",
abstract = "Introduction: The International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) has developed the IRLS (International Restless Legs Syndrome Severity Scale) and validated it as a clinician/researcher administered scale to be used when both patient and examiner are present. The IRLSSG recognized the need for a self-completing scale that can be used economically in clinical practice and in large population-based studies. In this study the validity and the reliability of the IRLS as a self-administered scale (sIRLS) is assessed. Methods: Established RLS patients were recruited by eight centers in four countries and consented to participate in this study. The validity of the sIRLS was assessed by patients completing the sIRLS before a clinician administered the IRLS. The reliability of the sIRLS was assessed by patients completing the sIRLS again, two weeks after the first one, provided no change had occurred. Results: Overall, 173 patients were recruited and 164 of them were included in the analyses. The sIRLS showed satisfactory scaling assumptions and no relevant floor or ceiling effect. One factor explained 61.3{\%} of the variance. Cronbach's alpha was 0.93 and the item homogeneity index was 0.59. Intraclass correlation coefficient between the sIRLS and the IRLS was 0.94. The sIRLS standard error of measurement was 3.61 (½ SD at baseline = 4.11). The results mostly overlapped those of the IRLS analyzed in parallel. Discussion: The sIRLS is a reliable, valid and precise instrument that showed tight association with the IRLS. These findings support the use of the sIRLS for self-evaluation of RLS severity. The responses obtained on the sIRLS and the IRLS scale varied slightly. Therefore, we recommend that either the sIRLS or the IRLS scale be used as the only scale for serial measures over time.",
keywords = "Patient completed, Restless Legs Syndrome, RLS symptoms, Self-administered, Severity scale, Validity/reliability",
author = "{International RLS Study Group} and Denise Sharon and Richard Allen and Pablo Martinez-Martin and Walters, {Arthur S.} and {Ferini Strambi}, Luigi and Birgit H{\"o}gl and Trotti, {Lynn Marie} and Mark Buchfuhrer and John Swieca and Bogan, {Richard K.} and Rochelle Zak and Hensley, {Jennifer G.} and Schaefer, {Laurel A.} and S. Marelli and Marco Zucconi and Ambra Stefani and Evi Holzknecht and Victoria Olvera and Hailey Meaklim and Irena Laska and Becker, {Philip M.}",
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T1 - Validation of the self-administered version of the international Restless Legs Syndrome study group severity rating scale – The sIRLS

AU - International RLS Study Group

AU - Sharon, Denise

AU - Allen, Richard

AU - Martinez-Martin, Pablo

AU - Walters, Arthur S.

AU - Ferini Strambi, Luigi

AU - Högl, Birgit

AU - Trotti, Lynn Marie

AU - Buchfuhrer, Mark

AU - Swieca, John

AU - Bogan, Richard K.

AU - Zak, Rochelle

AU - Hensley, Jennifer G.

AU - Schaefer, Laurel A.

AU - Marelli, S.

AU - Zucconi, Marco

AU - Stefani, Ambra

AU - Holzknecht, Evi

AU - Olvera, Victoria

AU - Meaklim, Hailey

AU - Laska, Irena

AU - Becker, Philip M.

PY - 2019/2/1

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N2 - Introduction: The International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) has developed the IRLS (International Restless Legs Syndrome Severity Scale) and validated it as a clinician/researcher administered scale to be used when both patient and examiner are present. The IRLSSG recognized the need for a self-completing scale that can be used economically in clinical practice and in large population-based studies. In this study the validity and the reliability of the IRLS as a self-administered scale (sIRLS) is assessed. Methods: Established RLS patients were recruited by eight centers in four countries and consented to participate in this study. The validity of the sIRLS was assessed by patients completing the sIRLS before a clinician administered the IRLS. The reliability of the sIRLS was assessed by patients completing the sIRLS again, two weeks after the first one, provided no change had occurred. Results: Overall, 173 patients were recruited and 164 of them were included in the analyses. The sIRLS showed satisfactory scaling assumptions and no relevant floor or ceiling effect. One factor explained 61.3% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha was 0.93 and the item homogeneity index was 0.59. Intraclass correlation coefficient between the sIRLS and the IRLS was 0.94. The sIRLS standard error of measurement was 3.61 (½ SD at baseline = 4.11). The results mostly overlapped those of the IRLS analyzed in parallel. Discussion: The sIRLS is a reliable, valid and precise instrument that showed tight association with the IRLS. These findings support the use of the sIRLS for self-evaluation of RLS severity. The responses obtained on the sIRLS and the IRLS scale varied slightly. Therefore, we recommend that either the sIRLS or the IRLS scale be used as the only scale for serial measures over time.

AB - Introduction: The International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) has developed the IRLS (International Restless Legs Syndrome Severity Scale) and validated it as a clinician/researcher administered scale to be used when both patient and examiner are present. The IRLSSG recognized the need for a self-completing scale that can be used economically in clinical practice and in large population-based studies. In this study the validity and the reliability of the IRLS as a self-administered scale (sIRLS) is assessed. Methods: Established RLS patients were recruited by eight centers in four countries and consented to participate in this study. The validity of the sIRLS was assessed by patients completing the sIRLS before a clinician administered the IRLS. The reliability of the sIRLS was assessed by patients completing the sIRLS again, two weeks after the first one, provided no change had occurred. Results: Overall, 173 patients were recruited and 164 of them were included in the analyses. The sIRLS showed satisfactory scaling assumptions and no relevant floor or ceiling effect. One factor explained 61.3% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha was 0.93 and the item homogeneity index was 0.59. Intraclass correlation coefficient between the sIRLS and the IRLS was 0.94. The sIRLS standard error of measurement was 3.61 (½ SD at baseline = 4.11). The results mostly overlapped those of the IRLS analyzed in parallel. Discussion: The sIRLS is a reliable, valid and precise instrument that showed tight association with the IRLS. These findings support the use of the sIRLS for self-evaluation of RLS severity. The responses obtained on the sIRLS and the IRLS scale varied slightly. Therefore, we recommend that either the sIRLS or the IRLS scale be used as the only scale for serial measures over time.

KW - Patient completed

KW - Restless Legs Syndrome

KW - RLS symptoms

KW - Self-administered

KW - Severity scale

KW - Validity/reliability

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