Vacuum-assisted closure in revision free flap reconstruction

Kiran Kakarala, Jeremy D. Richmon, Derrick T. Lin, Daniel G. Deschler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since their introduction in 1997, vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) dressings have found widespread use in the treatment of complicated surgical and traumatic wounds.1 The VAC system consists of a porous foam and overlying occlusive dressing to which sub-atmospheric pressure is applied. The VAC dressing has many beneficial effects on wound healing, including increased tissue perfusion, decreased wound edema and bacterial counts, and microdebridement of nonviable tissue. Healthy vascularized granulation tissue forms in the wound bed, allowing for more rapid healing than with conventional dressings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-624
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery
Volume137
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy
Free Tissue Flaps
Bandages
Occlusive Dressings
Atmospheric Pressure
Granulation Tissue
Bacterial Load
Wounds and Injuries
Wound Healing
Edema
Perfusion
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Vacuum-assisted closure in revision free flap reconstruction. / Kakarala, Kiran; Richmon, Jeremy D.; Lin, Derrick T.; Deschler, Daniel G.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 137, No. 6, 06.2011, p. 622-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kakarala, Kiran ; Richmon, Jeremy D. ; Lin, Derrick T. ; Deschler, Daniel G. / Vacuum-assisted closure in revision free flap reconstruction. In: Archives of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery. 2011 ; Vol. 137, No. 6. pp. 622-624.
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