Vaccine therapy for HIV: A historical review of the treatment of infectious diseases by active specific immunization with microbe-derived antigens

Donald S. Burke

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

A review of the history of 'vaccine therapy' for infectious diseases is presented. The concept originated when Auzias-Turenne introduced 'syphilitic vaccination' or 'syphilization' as a treatment for syphilis in Paris in the mid-1800s; his clinical studies probably influenced Pasteur's successful rabies postexposure vaccine trials. Robert Koch in Berlin in the 1890s observed that inoculation of tuberculin into patients with tuberculosis induced an inflammatory response in affected tissues, and advocated 'tuberculin therapy'. Sir Almroth Wright in London in the early 20th century devised methods to measure changes in serum 'opsonizing' activity in response to therapeutic inoculations with microbe-derived vaccines. Since the advent of antibiotics, active specific immunization with microbe-derived antigens (vaccine therapy) has been largely forgotten as a strategy for treatment of infectious diseases. Advances in antigen production and in molecular immunology now permit new tactics to probe, analyse and selectively alter in vivo human immune responses to infectious microbes. Our recent demonstration that vaccine therapy can boost natural immunity to HIV in infected patients should rekindle interest in this approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)883-891
Number of pages9
JournalVaccine
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

Keywords

  • AIDS HIV
  • Vaccine therapy
  • microbe-derived antigens
  • vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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