Vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease patients: Attitudes, Knowledge, and Uptake

Gurtej Malhi, Amir Rumman, Reka Thanabalan, Kenneth Croitoru, Mark S. Silverberg, A. Hillary Steinhart, Geoffrey C. Nguyen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Immunomodulators and biological agents, used to treat inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], are associated with an increased risk of infection, including vaccine-preventable infections. We assessed patient attitudes towards vaccination, knowledge of vaccine recommendations, and uptake of recommended vaccines. Methods: Patients attending IBD clinics completed a self-administered, structured, paper-based questionnaire. We collected demographic data, medical and immunisation history, self-reported patient uptake, knowledge, and perceptions of childhood and adult vaccinations. Results: The prevalence of treatment with biologicals, steroids, thiopurines, and methotrexate among the 300 respondents were 37.3%, 16.0%, 16.0%, and 5.7%, respectively. Self-reported vaccine completion was reported by 45.3% of patients. Vaccination uptake rates were 61.3% for influenza, 10.3% for pneumococcus, 61.0% for hepatitis B, 52.0% for hepatitis A, 26.0% for varicella, 20.7% for meningococcus, 5.3% for herpes zoster, and 11.0% for herpes papilloma virus [females only]. Significant predictors of vaccine completion were annual vaccination review by family physician (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82) or gastroenterologist [OR = 1.72], current steroid use [OR = 1.28], and current or prior treatment with biologicals [OR = 1.42]. The majority of patients reported that the primary responsibility to ensure vaccine completion lies with the patient [41.7%] and the family physician [32.3%]. Uncertainty about indications, fears of side effects, and concerns regarding vaccine safety were the most commonly reported reasons for non-uptake [22.0%, 20.7%, and 5.3%, respectively]. Conclusions: Uptake of recommended vaccines among IBD patients is suboptimal. Annual vaccination reviews by both family physician and gastroenterologist may improve vaccine uptake. Interventions targeted at improving vaccination uptake in IBD patients are needed. Copyright

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-444
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Crohn's and Colitis
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Vaccination
Vaccines
Family Physicians
Odds Ratio
Steroids
Neisseria meningitidis
Hepatitis A
Chickenpox
Herpes Zoster
Immunologic Factors
Papilloma
Biological Factors
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Infection
Hepatitis B
Methotrexate
Human Influenza
Uncertainty
Fear

Keywords

  • IBD
  • vaccination
  • vaccination uptake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Malhi, G., Rumman, A., Thanabalan, R., Croitoru, K., Silverberg, M. S., Hillary Steinhart, A., & Nguyen, G. C. (2015). Vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease patients: Attitudes, Knowledge, and Uptake. Journal of Crohn's and Colitis, 9(6), 439-444. https://doi.org/10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjv064

Vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease patients : Attitudes, Knowledge, and Uptake. / Malhi, Gurtej; Rumman, Amir; Thanabalan, Reka; Croitoru, Kenneth; Silverberg, Mark S.; Hillary Steinhart, A.; Nguyen, Geoffrey C.

In: Journal of Crohn's and Colitis, Vol. 9, No. 6, 01.06.2015, p. 439-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malhi, G, Rumman, A, Thanabalan, R, Croitoru, K, Silverberg, MS, Hillary Steinhart, A & Nguyen, GC 2015, 'Vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease patients: Attitudes, Knowledge, and Uptake', Journal of Crohn's and Colitis, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 439-444. https://doi.org/10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjv064
Malhi G, Rumman A, Thanabalan R, Croitoru K, Silverberg MS, Hillary Steinhart A et al. Vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease patients: Attitudes, Knowledge, and Uptake. Journal of Crohn's and Colitis. 2015 Jun 1;9(6):439-444. https://doi.org/10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjv064
Malhi, Gurtej ; Rumman, Amir ; Thanabalan, Reka ; Croitoru, Kenneth ; Silverberg, Mark S. ; Hillary Steinhart, A. ; Nguyen, Geoffrey C. / Vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease patients : Attitudes, Knowledge, and Uptake. In: Journal of Crohn's and Colitis. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 6. pp. 439-444.
@article{a8dc7d6e659a44318e7bcea3dfcc2178,
title = "Vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease patients: Attitudes, Knowledge, and Uptake",
abstract = "Background: Immunomodulators and biological agents, used to treat inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], are associated with an increased risk of infection, including vaccine-preventable infections. We assessed patient attitudes towards vaccination, knowledge of vaccine recommendations, and uptake of recommended vaccines. Methods: Patients attending IBD clinics completed a self-administered, structured, paper-based questionnaire. We collected demographic data, medical and immunisation history, self-reported patient uptake, knowledge, and perceptions of childhood and adult vaccinations. Results: The prevalence of treatment with biologicals, steroids, thiopurines, and methotrexate among the 300 respondents were 37.3{\%}, 16.0{\%}, 16.0{\%}, and 5.7{\%}, respectively. Self-reported vaccine completion was reported by 45.3{\%} of patients. Vaccination uptake rates were 61.3{\%} for influenza, 10.3{\%} for pneumococcus, 61.0{\%} for hepatitis B, 52.0{\%} for hepatitis A, 26.0{\%} for varicella, 20.7{\%} for meningococcus, 5.3{\%} for herpes zoster, and 11.0{\%} for herpes papilloma virus [females only]. Significant predictors of vaccine completion were annual vaccination review by family physician (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82) or gastroenterologist [OR = 1.72], current steroid use [OR = 1.28], and current or prior treatment with biologicals [OR = 1.42]. The majority of patients reported that the primary responsibility to ensure vaccine completion lies with the patient [41.7{\%}] and the family physician [32.3{\%}]. Uncertainty about indications, fears of side effects, and concerns regarding vaccine safety were the most commonly reported reasons for non-uptake [22.0{\%}, 20.7{\%}, and 5.3{\%}, respectively]. Conclusions: Uptake of recommended vaccines among IBD patients is suboptimal. Annual vaccination reviews by both family physician and gastroenterologist may improve vaccine uptake. Interventions targeted at improving vaccination uptake in IBD patients are needed. Copyright",
keywords = "IBD, vaccination, vaccination uptake",
author = "Gurtej Malhi and Amir Rumman and Reka Thanabalan and Kenneth Croitoru and Silverberg, {Mark S.} and {Hillary Steinhart}, A. and Nguyen, {Geoffrey C.}",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjv064",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "439--444",
journal = "Journal of Crohn's and Colitis",
issn = "1873-9946",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vaccination in inflammatory bowel disease patients

T2 - Attitudes, Knowledge, and Uptake

AU - Malhi, Gurtej

AU - Rumman, Amir

AU - Thanabalan, Reka

AU - Croitoru, Kenneth

AU - Silverberg, Mark S.

AU - Hillary Steinhart, A.

AU - Nguyen, Geoffrey C.

PY - 2015/6/1

Y1 - 2015/6/1

N2 - Background: Immunomodulators and biological agents, used to treat inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], are associated with an increased risk of infection, including vaccine-preventable infections. We assessed patient attitudes towards vaccination, knowledge of vaccine recommendations, and uptake of recommended vaccines. Methods: Patients attending IBD clinics completed a self-administered, structured, paper-based questionnaire. We collected demographic data, medical and immunisation history, self-reported patient uptake, knowledge, and perceptions of childhood and adult vaccinations. Results: The prevalence of treatment with biologicals, steroids, thiopurines, and methotrexate among the 300 respondents were 37.3%, 16.0%, 16.0%, and 5.7%, respectively. Self-reported vaccine completion was reported by 45.3% of patients. Vaccination uptake rates were 61.3% for influenza, 10.3% for pneumococcus, 61.0% for hepatitis B, 52.0% for hepatitis A, 26.0% for varicella, 20.7% for meningococcus, 5.3% for herpes zoster, and 11.0% for herpes papilloma virus [females only]. Significant predictors of vaccine completion were annual vaccination review by family physician (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82) or gastroenterologist [OR = 1.72], current steroid use [OR = 1.28], and current or prior treatment with biologicals [OR = 1.42]. The majority of patients reported that the primary responsibility to ensure vaccine completion lies with the patient [41.7%] and the family physician [32.3%]. Uncertainty about indications, fears of side effects, and concerns regarding vaccine safety were the most commonly reported reasons for non-uptake [22.0%, 20.7%, and 5.3%, respectively]. Conclusions: Uptake of recommended vaccines among IBD patients is suboptimal. Annual vaccination reviews by both family physician and gastroenterologist may improve vaccine uptake. Interventions targeted at improving vaccination uptake in IBD patients are needed. Copyright

AB - Background: Immunomodulators and biological agents, used to treat inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], are associated with an increased risk of infection, including vaccine-preventable infections. We assessed patient attitudes towards vaccination, knowledge of vaccine recommendations, and uptake of recommended vaccines. Methods: Patients attending IBD clinics completed a self-administered, structured, paper-based questionnaire. We collected demographic data, medical and immunisation history, self-reported patient uptake, knowledge, and perceptions of childhood and adult vaccinations. Results: The prevalence of treatment with biologicals, steroids, thiopurines, and methotrexate among the 300 respondents were 37.3%, 16.0%, 16.0%, and 5.7%, respectively. Self-reported vaccine completion was reported by 45.3% of patients. Vaccination uptake rates were 61.3% for influenza, 10.3% for pneumococcus, 61.0% for hepatitis B, 52.0% for hepatitis A, 26.0% for varicella, 20.7% for meningococcus, 5.3% for herpes zoster, and 11.0% for herpes papilloma virus [females only]. Significant predictors of vaccine completion were annual vaccination review by family physician (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82) or gastroenterologist [OR = 1.72], current steroid use [OR = 1.28], and current or prior treatment with biologicals [OR = 1.42]. The majority of patients reported that the primary responsibility to ensure vaccine completion lies with the patient [41.7%] and the family physician [32.3%]. Uncertainty about indications, fears of side effects, and concerns regarding vaccine safety were the most commonly reported reasons for non-uptake [22.0%, 20.7%, and 5.3%, respectively]. Conclusions: Uptake of recommended vaccines among IBD patients is suboptimal. Annual vaccination reviews by both family physician and gastroenterologist may improve vaccine uptake. Interventions targeted at improving vaccination uptake in IBD patients are needed. Copyright

KW - IBD

KW - vaccination

KW - vaccination uptake

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84963732946&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84963732946&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjv064

DO - 10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjv064

M3 - Article

C2 - 25908717

AN - SCOPUS:84963732946

VL - 9

SP - 439

EP - 444

JO - Journal of Crohn's and Colitis

JF - Journal of Crohn's and Colitis

SN - 1873-9946

IS - 6

ER -