Utilizing broad-based partnerships to design a precision approach to implementing evidence-based home visiting

Emily E. Haroz, Allison Ingalls, Joshua Wadlin, Crystal Kee, Marissa Begay, Nicole Neault, Allison Barlow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to describe a participatory process for adapting an implementation strategy, using a precision approach, for an evidence-based home visiting program, Family Spirit. Family Spirit serves Native American and low-income communities nationwide. To redesign Family Spirit's implementation strategy, we used workshops (n = 5) with key stakeholders and conducted an online survey with implementers (n = 81) to identify hypothesized active ingredients and “pivot points” to guide when to tailor the program and for whom. Active ingredients identified included the relationship between the home visitor and clients, lessons ensuring child safety and healthy development, parent–child communication, and goal setting. Pivot points included whether the client is a first-time mother who has substance abuse history, has a baby at risk for childhood obesity, and/or has sexual or reproductive health concerns. These results are informing the adaptation of Family Spirit’ implementation strategy making it more responsive to diverse families while balancing fidelity to the previously proven standard model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1100-1113
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of community psychology
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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