Utility of the lateral arm flap in head and neck reconstruction

Maurice Y. Nahabedian, E Gene Deune, Paul Manson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Soft-tissue defects of the head and neck are often reconstructed with fasciocutaneous free flaps. The radial forearm flap is used most commonly, however the lateral arm flap may be the flap of choice in certain situations. Advantages include flap elevation with simultaneous tumor ablation, avoidance of intraoperative patient position changes, and primary closure of the donor site. After extirpative procedures of the head and neck region, 4 patients were reconstructed with the lateral arm flap. Flap survival was 100%, a vein graft to supplement the short pedicle length was necessary in 1 patient, all donor sites were closed primarily, and secondary procedures to reduce flap bulk were necessary in 2 patients. The lateral arm flap is an excellent alternative to the radial forearm flap and should be included in the armamentarium of the reconstructive head and neck surgeon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-505
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Plastic Surgery
Volume46
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2001

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Arm
Neck
Head
Forearm
Tissue Donors
Free Tissue Flaps
Veins
Transplants
Survival
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Utility of the lateral arm flap in head and neck reconstruction. / Nahabedian, Maurice Y.; Deune, E Gene; Manson, Paul.

In: Annals of Plastic Surgery, Vol. 46, No. 5, 2001, p. 501-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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