Utility and validity of DISC1 mouse models in biological psychiatry

T. Tomoda, A. Sumitomo, Hanna Jaaro-Peled, Akira Sawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have seen an era of explosive progress in translating neurobiology into etiological understanding of mental disorders for the past 10-15. years. The discovery of Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene was one of the major driving forces that have contributed to the progress. The finding that DISC1 plays crucial roles in neurodevelopment and synapse regulation clearly underscored the utility and validity of DISC1-related biology in advancing our understanding of pathophysiological processes underlying psychiatric conditions. Despite recent genetic studies that failed to identify DISC1 as a risk gene for sporadic cases of schizophrenia, DISC1 mutant mice, coupled with various environmental stressors, have proven successful in satisfying face validity as models of a wide range of human psychiatric conditions. Investigating mental disorders using these models is expected to further contribute to the circuit-level understanding of the pathological mechanisms, as well as to the development of novel therapeutic strategies in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeuroscience
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

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Biological Psychiatry
Schizophrenia
Mental Disorders
Psychiatry
Neurobiology
Reproducibility of Results
Synapses
Genes

Keywords

  • DISC1
  • Mouse models
  • Psychiatry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Utility and validity of DISC1 mouse models in biological psychiatry. / Tomoda, T.; Sumitomo, A.; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna; Sawa, Akira.

In: Neuroscience, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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