Using the hierarchy of control technologies to improve healthcare facility infection control: Lessons from severe acute respiratory syndrome

Craig D. Thorne, Shahram Khozin, Melissa A. McDiarmid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Health care facilities need to review their infection control plans to prepare for the possible resurgence of severe acute respiratory syndrome, other emerging pathogens, familiar infectious agents such as tuberculosis and influenza, and bioterrorist threats. This article describes the classic "hierarchy of control technologies" that was successfully used by occupational and environmental medicine professionals to protect workers from illness and death during the resurgence of tuberculosis in the 1990s. Also discussed are related guidelines from building and equipment professional organizations and novel infection control techniques used successfully by various hospitals in Asia, Canada, and the United States during the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic. Taken together, they suggest a framework upon which a comprehensive infection control plan can be crafted to prevent the spread of deadly infectious agents to health care workers (clinicians and paraprofessionals), uninfected patients and visitors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)613-622
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume46
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Facility Regulation and Control
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
Infection Control
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Tuberculosis
Visitors to Patients
Environmental Medicine
Occupational Medicine
Health Facilities
Human Influenza
Canada
Guidelines
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Using the hierarchy of control technologies to improve healthcare facility infection control : Lessons from severe acute respiratory syndrome. / Thorne, Craig D.; Khozin, Shahram; McDiarmid, Melissa A.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 46, No. 7, 07.2004, p. 613-622.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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