Using Patients' Social Network to Improve Compliance to Outpatient Screening Colonoscopy Appointments Among Blacks: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Adeyinka O. Laiyemo, John Kwagyan, Carla D. Williams, Jessica Rogers, Angesom Kibreab, Momodu A. Jack, Edward E. Lee, Hassan Brim, Hassan Ashktorab, Charles D. Howell, Duane T. Smoot, Elizabeth A Platz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Patient navigation improves colorectal cancer screening among underserved populations, but limited resources preclude widespread adoption in minority-serving institutions. We evaluated whether a patient's self-selected social contact person can effectively facilitate outpatient screening colonoscopy. METHODS: From September 2014 to March 2017 in an urban tertiary center, 399 black participants scheduled for outpatient screening colonoscopy self-selected a social contact person to be a facilitator and provided the person's phone number. Of these, 201 participants (50.4%) were randomly assigned to the intervention arm for their social contact persons to be engaged by phone. The study was explained to the social contact person with details about colonoscopy screening and bowel preparation process. The social contacts were asked to assist the participants, provide support, and encourage compliance with the procedures. The social contact person was not contacted in the usual care arm, n = 198 (49.6%). We evaluated attendance to the scheduled outpatient colonoscopy and adequacy of bowel preparation. Analysis was performed by intention to treat. RESULTS: The social contact person was reached and agreed to be involved for 130 of the 201 participants (64.7%). No differences were found in the proportion of participants who underwent screening colonoscopy (77.3% vs 77.2%; relative risk = 1.01; 95% confidence interval: 0.91-1.12), but there was a modest increase in the proportion with adequate bowel preparation with social contact involvement (89.1% vs 80.9%; relative risk = 1.10; 95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.21). DISCUSSION: Engaging a patient's social network to serve in the role of a patient navigator did not improve compliance to outpatient screening colonoscopy but modestly improved the adequacy of bowel preparation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1671-1677
Number of pages7
JournalThe American Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume114
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

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Colonoscopy
Social Support
Appointments and Schedules
Outpatients
Randomized Controlled Trials
Patient Navigation
Confidence Intervals
Vulnerable Populations
Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

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Using Patients' Social Network to Improve Compliance to Outpatient Screening Colonoscopy Appointments Among Blacks : A Randomized Clinical Trial. / Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Kwagyan, John; Williams, Carla D.; Rogers, Jessica; Kibreab, Angesom; Jack, Momodu A.; Lee, Edward E.; Brim, Hassan; Ashktorab, Hassan; Howell, Charles D.; Smoot, Duane T.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

In: The American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 114, No. 10, 01.10.2019, p. 1671-1677.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Laiyemo, AO, Kwagyan, J, Williams, CD, Rogers, J, Kibreab, A, Jack, MA, Lee, EE, Brim, H, Ashktorab, H, Howell, CD, Smoot, DT & Platz, EA 2019, 'Using Patients' Social Network to Improve Compliance to Outpatient Screening Colonoscopy Appointments Among Blacks: A Randomized Clinical Trial', The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 114, no. 10, pp. 1671-1677. https://doi.org/10.14309/ajg.0000000000000387
Laiyemo, Adeyinka O. ; Kwagyan, John ; Williams, Carla D. ; Rogers, Jessica ; Kibreab, Angesom ; Jack, Momodu A. ; Lee, Edward E. ; Brim, Hassan ; Ashktorab, Hassan ; Howell, Charles D. ; Smoot, Duane T. ; Platz, Elizabeth A. / Using Patients' Social Network to Improve Compliance to Outpatient Screening Colonoscopy Appointments Among Blacks : A Randomized Clinical Trial. In: The American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2019 ; Vol. 114, No. 10. pp. 1671-1677.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Patient navigation improves colorectal cancer screening among underserved populations, but limited resources preclude widespread adoption in minority-serving institutions. We evaluated whether a patient's self-selected social contact person can effectively facilitate outpatient screening colonoscopy. METHODS: From September 2014 to March 2017 in an urban tertiary center, 399 black participants scheduled for outpatient screening colonoscopy self-selected a social contact person to be a facilitator and provided the person's phone number. Of these, 201 participants (50.4{\%}) were randomly assigned to the intervention arm for their social contact persons to be engaged by phone. The study was explained to the social contact person with details about colonoscopy screening and bowel preparation process. The social contacts were asked to assist the participants, provide support, and encourage compliance with the procedures. The social contact person was not contacted in the usual care arm, n = 198 (49.6{\%}). We evaluated attendance to the scheduled outpatient colonoscopy and adequacy of bowel preparation. Analysis was performed by intention to treat. RESULTS: The social contact person was reached and agreed to be involved for 130 of the 201 participants (64.7{\%}). No differences were found in the proportion of participants who underwent screening colonoscopy (77.3{\%} vs 77.2{\%}; relative risk = 1.01; 95{\%} confidence interval: 0.91-1.12), but there was a modest increase in the proportion with adequate bowel preparation with social contact involvement (89.1{\%} vs 80.9{\%}; relative risk = 1.10; 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.00-1.21). DISCUSSION: Engaging a patient's social network to serve in the role of a patient navigator did not improve compliance to outpatient screening colonoscopy but modestly improved the adequacy of bowel preparation.",
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T1 - Using Patients' Social Network to Improve Compliance to Outpatient Screening Colonoscopy Appointments Among Blacks

T2 - A Randomized Clinical Trial

AU - Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.

AU - Kwagyan, John

AU - Williams, Carla D.

AU - Rogers, Jessica

AU - Kibreab, Angesom

AU - Jack, Momodu A.

AU - Lee, Edward E.

AU - Brim, Hassan

AU - Ashktorab, Hassan

AU - Howell, Charles D.

AU - Smoot, Duane T.

AU - Platz, Elizabeth A

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Patient navigation improves colorectal cancer screening among underserved populations, but limited resources preclude widespread adoption in minority-serving institutions. We evaluated whether a patient's self-selected social contact person can effectively facilitate outpatient screening colonoscopy. METHODS: From September 2014 to March 2017 in an urban tertiary center, 399 black participants scheduled for outpatient screening colonoscopy self-selected a social contact person to be a facilitator and provided the person's phone number. Of these, 201 participants (50.4%) were randomly assigned to the intervention arm for their social contact persons to be engaged by phone. The study was explained to the social contact person with details about colonoscopy screening and bowel preparation process. The social contacts were asked to assist the participants, provide support, and encourage compliance with the procedures. The social contact person was not contacted in the usual care arm, n = 198 (49.6%). We evaluated attendance to the scheduled outpatient colonoscopy and adequacy of bowel preparation. Analysis was performed by intention to treat. RESULTS: The social contact person was reached and agreed to be involved for 130 of the 201 participants (64.7%). No differences were found in the proportion of participants who underwent screening colonoscopy (77.3% vs 77.2%; relative risk = 1.01; 95% confidence interval: 0.91-1.12), but there was a modest increase in the proportion with adequate bowel preparation with social contact involvement (89.1% vs 80.9%; relative risk = 1.10; 95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.21). DISCUSSION: Engaging a patient's social network to serve in the role of a patient navigator did not improve compliance to outpatient screening colonoscopy but modestly improved the adequacy of bowel preparation.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Patient navigation improves colorectal cancer screening among underserved populations, but limited resources preclude widespread adoption in minority-serving institutions. We evaluated whether a patient's self-selected social contact person can effectively facilitate outpatient screening colonoscopy. METHODS: From September 2014 to March 2017 in an urban tertiary center, 399 black participants scheduled for outpatient screening colonoscopy self-selected a social contact person to be a facilitator and provided the person's phone number. Of these, 201 participants (50.4%) were randomly assigned to the intervention arm for their social contact persons to be engaged by phone. The study was explained to the social contact person with details about colonoscopy screening and bowel preparation process. The social contacts were asked to assist the participants, provide support, and encourage compliance with the procedures. The social contact person was not contacted in the usual care arm, n = 198 (49.6%). We evaluated attendance to the scheduled outpatient colonoscopy and adequacy of bowel preparation. Analysis was performed by intention to treat. RESULTS: The social contact person was reached and agreed to be involved for 130 of the 201 participants (64.7%). No differences were found in the proportion of participants who underwent screening colonoscopy (77.3% vs 77.2%; relative risk = 1.01; 95% confidence interval: 0.91-1.12), but there was a modest increase in the proportion with adequate bowel preparation with social contact involvement (89.1% vs 80.9%; relative risk = 1.10; 95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.21). DISCUSSION: Engaging a patient's social network to serve in the role of a patient navigator did not improve compliance to outpatient screening colonoscopy but modestly improved the adequacy of bowel preparation.

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