Using formal qualitative methods to guide early development of an augmented reality display system for surgery

C. H. Lio, C. M. Carswell, Q. Han, A. Park, S. Strup, W. B. Seales, D. Clarke, G. Lee, J. Hoskins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Nine laparoscopic surgical experts (2 residents, 4 fellows, and 3 surgeons) underwent semi-structured interview questions to evaluate the concept of a "dual-view" display for laparoscopic surgery. The 30-40 minute audio-recorded interviews were transcribed, submitted to an open source qualitative program for classification and categorizing, and were condensed for the iterative processes of analysis and interpretation. Findings revealed that despite the relatively brief interview sessions and limited number of surgical experts available, the experts provided sufficient insights and suggestions to guide further development of prototypes. This means that the use of semi-structured interviews as an expert knowledge elicitation technique may be suitable for assessing the development of augmented reality display systems for surgical and training applications, and it may have promise for the development of augmented and virtual environments more genially.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1181-1185
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781615676231
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009 - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: Oct 19 2009Oct 23 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period10/19/0910/23/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Using formal qualitative methods to guide early development of an augmented reality display system for surgery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this