Usefulness of anthropometrics and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for estimating abdominal obesity measured by magnetic resonance imaging in older men and women

Kerry J. Stewart, James R. DeRegis, Katherine L. Turner, Anita C. Bacher, Jidong Sung, Paul S. Hees, Edward P. Shapiro, Matthew Tayback, Pamela Ouyang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: Increasing evidence suggests that abdominal obesity may be a better predictor of disease risk than total fatness. This study sought to determine how obesity and fat distribution measured by readily available anthropometric and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) methods is related to abdominal obesity assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Men (n = 43) and women (n = 47), ages 55 to 75 years, were assessed for body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, waist circumference, and skin folds by anthropometric methods; for percentage of body fat by DXA; and for abdominal total, subcutaneous, and visceral fat by MRI. RESULTS: In stepwise regression models, the waist-to-hip ratio explained 50% of the variance in abdominal visceral fat among men (P < .01), and body mass index explained an additional 6% of the variance (P < .01). Among women, waist circumference was the only independent correlate of abdominal visceral fat, accounting for 52% of the variance (P < .01). Among men, the percentage of body fat was the only independent correlate of abdominal subcutaneous fat, explaining 65% of the variance (P < .01). Among women, the percentage of body fat explained 77% of the variance in abdominal subcutaneous fat and body mass index explained an additional 3% (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Obesity and body composition obtained by readily available anthropometric methods and DXA provide informative estimates of abdominal obesity assessed by MRI imaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-114
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2003

Keywords

  • Abdominal fat
  • Aging
  • Body composition
  • Central obesity
  • Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry
  • Magnetic resonance imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

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