Use of vaxfectin adjuvant with DNA vaccine encoding the measles virus hemagglutinin and fusion proteins protects juvenile and infant rhesus macaques against measles virus

Chien Hsiung Pan, Gretchen S. Jimenez, Nitya Nair, Qun Wei, Robert J. Adams, Fernando P. Polack, Alain Rolland, Adrián Vilalta, Diane E. Griffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A measles virus vaccine for infants under 6 months of age would help control measles. DNA vaccines hold promise, but none has provided full protection from challenge. Codon-optimized plasmid DNAs encoding the measles virus hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins were formulated with the cationic lipid-based adjuvant Vaxfectin. In mice, antibody and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production were increased by two- to threefold. In macaques, juveniles vaccinated at 0 and 28 days with 500 μg of DNA intradermally or with 1 mg intramuscularly developed sustained neutralizing antibody and H- and F-specific IFN-γ responses. Infant monkeys developed sustained neutralizing antibody and T cells secreting IFN-γ and interleukin-4. Twelve to 15 months after vaccination, vaccinated monkeys were protected from an intratracheal challenge: viremia was undetectable by cocultivation and rashes did not appear, while two naïve monkeys developed viremia and rashes. The use of Vaxfectin-formulated DNA is a promising approach to the development of a measles vaccine for young infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1214-1221
Number of pages8
JournalClinical and Vaccine Immunology
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Microbiology (medical)

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