Use of the Frank-Starling mechanism during submaximal versus maximal upright exercise

G. D. Plotnick, Lewis Becker, M. L. Fisher, Gary Gerstenblith, D. G. Renlund, J. L. Fleg, Myron Weisfeldt, Edward Lakatta

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Abstract

To evaluate the extent to which the Frank-Starling mechanism is utilized during successive stages of vigorous upright exercise, absolute left ventricular end-diastolic volume and ejection fraction were determined by gated blood pool scintigraphy at rest and during multilevel maximal upright bicycle exercise in 30 normal males aged 26-50 yr, who were able to exercise to 125 W or greater. Left ventricular end-systolic volume, stroke volume, and cardiac output were calculated at rest and during each successive 3-min stage of exercise [25, 50, 75, 100, and 125-225 W (peak)]. During early exercise (25 W), end-diastolic and stroke volumes increased (+17 ± 1 and +31 ± 4%, respectively), with no change in end-systolic volume. With further exercise (50-75 W) end-diastolic volume remained unchanged as end-systolic volume decreased (-12 ± 4 and -24 + 5%, respectively). At peak exercise end-diastolic volume decreased to resting level, stroke volume remained at a plateau, and end-systolic volume further decreased (-48 ± 7%). Thus the Frank-Starling mechanism is used early in exercise, perhaps because of a delay in sympathetic mobilization, and does not appear to play a role in the later stages of vigorous exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume251
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Starlings
Stroke Volume
Gated Blood-Pool Imaging
Cardiac Output

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

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title = "Use of the Frank-Starling mechanism during submaximal versus maximal upright exercise",
abstract = "To evaluate the extent to which the Frank-Starling mechanism is utilized during successive stages of vigorous upright exercise, absolute left ventricular end-diastolic volume and ejection fraction were determined by gated blood pool scintigraphy at rest and during multilevel maximal upright bicycle exercise in 30 normal males aged 26-50 yr, who were able to exercise to 125 W or greater. Left ventricular end-systolic volume, stroke volume, and cardiac output were calculated at rest and during each successive 3-min stage of exercise [25, 50, 75, 100, and 125-225 W (peak)]. During early exercise (25 W), end-diastolic and stroke volumes increased (+17 ± 1 and +31 ± 4{\%}, respectively), with no change in end-systolic volume. With further exercise (50-75 W) end-diastolic volume remained unchanged as end-systolic volume decreased (-12 ± 4 and -24 + 5{\%}, respectively). At peak exercise end-diastolic volume decreased to resting level, stroke volume remained at a plateau, and end-systolic volume further decreased (-48 ± 7{\%}). Thus the Frank-Starling mechanism is used early in exercise, perhaps because of a delay in sympathetic mobilization, and does not appear to play a role in the later stages of vigorous exercise.",
author = "Plotnick, {G. D.} and Lewis Becker and Fisher, {M. L.} and Gary Gerstenblith and Renlund, {D. G.} and Fleg, {J. L.} and Myron Weisfeldt and Edward Lakatta",
year = "1986",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "251",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0363-6135",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of the Frank-Starling mechanism during submaximal versus maximal upright exercise

AU - Plotnick, G. D.

AU - Becker, Lewis

AU - Fisher, M. L.

AU - Gerstenblith, Gary

AU - Renlund, D. G.

AU - Fleg, J. L.

AU - Weisfeldt, Myron

AU - Lakatta, Edward

PY - 1986

Y1 - 1986

N2 - To evaluate the extent to which the Frank-Starling mechanism is utilized during successive stages of vigorous upright exercise, absolute left ventricular end-diastolic volume and ejection fraction were determined by gated blood pool scintigraphy at rest and during multilevel maximal upright bicycle exercise in 30 normal males aged 26-50 yr, who were able to exercise to 125 W or greater. Left ventricular end-systolic volume, stroke volume, and cardiac output were calculated at rest and during each successive 3-min stage of exercise [25, 50, 75, 100, and 125-225 W (peak)]. During early exercise (25 W), end-diastolic and stroke volumes increased (+17 ± 1 and +31 ± 4%, respectively), with no change in end-systolic volume. With further exercise (50-75 W) end-diastolic volume remained unchanged as end-systolic volume decreased (-12 ± 4 and -24 + 5%, respectively). At peak exercise end-diastolic volume decreased to resting level, stroke volume remained at a plateau, and end-systolic volume further decreased (-48 ± 7%). Thus the Frank-Starling mechanism is used early in exercise, perhaps because of a delay in sympathetic mobilization, and does not appear to play a role in the later stages of vigorous exercise.

AB - To evaluate the extent to which the Frank-Starling mechanism is utilized during successive stages of vigorous upright exercise, absolute left ventricular end-diastolic volume and ejection fraction were determined by gated blood pool scintigraphy at rest and during multilevel maximal upright bicycle exercise in 30 normal males aged 26-50 yr, who were able to exercise to 125 W or greater. Left ventricular end-systolic volume, stroke volume, and cardiac output were calculated at rest and during each successive 3-min stage of exercise [25, 50, 75, 100, and 125-225 W (peak)]. During early exercise (25 W), end-diastolic and stroke volumes increased (+17 ± 1 and +31 ± 4%, respectively), with no change in end-systolic volume. With further exercise (50-75 W) end-diastolic volume remained unchanged as end-systolic volume decreased (-12 ± 4 and -24 + 5%, respectively). At peak exercise end-diastolic volume decreased to resting level, stroke volume remained at a plateau, and end-systolic volume further decreased (-48 ± 7%). Thus the Frank-Starling mechanism is used early in exercise, perhaps because of a delay in sympathetic mobilization, and does not appear to play a role in the later stages of vigorous exercise.

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