Use of social services by pregnant Medicaid eligible women in Baltimore.

C. S. Minkovitz, A. K. Duggan, M. H. Fox, M. H. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To use linked health and social service databases to determine differences in the use of social services by pregnant women in different managed care systems. METHODS: Comparison of service use by women enrolled in a fee-for-service primary care case management program (Maryland Access to Care or MAC), in a capitated health maintenance organization (HMO), or not assigned to managed care using six state databases. Participants included 5181 women receiving Medical Assistance (MA) and delivering in Baltimore City in 1993. Outcome measures were receipt of WIC, AFDC, and Food Stamps. RESULTS: The overall proportions of women receiving WIC, AFDC, and Food Stamps at delivery were 52.7%, 89.2%, and 62.7%, respectively. Women enrolled in an HMO at delivery were less likely to be receiving WIC (adjusted odds ratios, 0.8, 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.93), AFDC (OR, 0.20; CI, 0.03 to 0.43 for women with prior children and OR 0.13; CI, 0.09 to 0.20 for women without prior children), and Food Stamps (OR 0.77; CI, 0.59 to 0.95 for women with prior children and OR, 0.49; CI, 0.35 to 0.67 for women without prior children) than their MAC counterparts. Women not assigned to managed care also generally were less likely than their MAC counterparts to receive WIC (OR 0.55; CI, 0.46, 0.66), AFDC (OR 1.07; CI 0.83, 1.30 for women with prior children and OR 0.24; CI 0.18, 0.34 for women without prior children), and Food Stamps (OR 0.31; CI 0.08, 0.55 for women with prior children and OR 0.31; CI 0.23, 0.41 for women without prior children). CONCLUSIONS: Although many low-income pregnant women qualify for select social services, receipt of WIC and Food Stamps was low. Increasing efforts are needed by managed care systems and public health agencies to ensure delivery of appropriate services for women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-127
Number of pages11
JournalMaternal and child health journal
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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