Use of single-dose nevirapine for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1: does development of resistance matter?

Michelle S. McConnell, Jeffrey S.A. Stringer, Athena P. Kourtis, Paul J. Weidle, Susan H. Eshleman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Nevirapine resistance has been detected in a considerable proportion of women after single-dose nevirapine (SD-NVP) for the prevention of mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus-1 transmission. As a result, concern has been raised about the effectiveness of subsequent nevirapine-based treatment. Studies in Thailand, Botswana, and South Africa have assessed virologic treatment response after SD-NVP. These studies did not find any significant difference in virologic response for women who began treatment >6 months after SD-NVP exposure. Two studies found worse response rates in women when treatment was initiated within 6 months of SD-NVP exposure. Furthermore, 2 studies found no difference in human immunodeficiency virus transmission rates from mother to child after the receipt of SD-NVP in repeat pregnancies. These data support the use of SD-NVP as 1 option for the prevention of mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus-1 transmission in resource-limited settings, particularly in settings where more complex regimens are not yet available. Further research in the optimization of perinatal prevention regimens is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S56-S63
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume197
Issue number3 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

Keywords

  • PMTCT
  • nevirapine
  • resistance
  • treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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