Use of placebo in supplementation studies-vitamin D research illustrates an ethical quandary

Leigh A. Frame, Jonathan P. Fischer, Gail Geller, Lawrence J Cheskin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

History has shown that without explicit and enforced guidelines, even well-intentioned researchers can fail to adequately examine the ethical pros and cons of study design choices. One area in which consensus does not yet exist is the use of placebo groups in vitamin supplementation studies. As a prime example, we focus on vitamin D research. We aim to provide an overview of the ethical issues in placebo-controlled studies and guide future discussion about the ethical use of placebo groups. Research in the field of vitamin D shows variation in how placebo groups are used. We outline four types of control groups in use: active-control, placebo-control with restrictions on supplementation, placebo-control without supplementation restrictions, and placebo-control with rescue repletion therapy. The first two types highlight discrete ethical issues: active-control trials limit the ability to detect a difference; placebo-control trials that restrict supplementation potentially place subjects at risk of undue harm. The final two, placebo-control without supplementation restrictions or with rescue repletion therapy, offer potential solutions to these ethical challenges. Building on this, guidelines should be established and enforced on the use of placebo in supplementation studies. Furthermore, the field of vitamin D research has the potential to set an example worthy of emulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number347
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 13 2018

Keywords

  • Dietary supplements
  • Nutrition therapy
  • Research design
  • Research ethics
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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