Use of patient-controlled analgesia with critically ill patients: a risk/benefit analysis.

J. A. Stanik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), a system by which patients self-administer intravenous doses of narcotics using specially programmed infusion pumps, has been used for pain management in acute care settings for nearly two decades. The safety and effectiveness of PCA has been documented in many acutely ill patient populations. Its introduction into critical care practice in the last five years has provided an important adjunct to traditional methods of pain management. However, intravenous narcotics of any type can provoke hemodynamic or respiratory complications in these compromised patients. Nursing expertise is a key factor in the successful implementation of PCA in critically ill patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)741-747
Number of pages7
JournalAACN clinical issues in critical care nursing
Volume2
Issue number4
StatePublished - Nov 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Patient-Controlled Analgesia
Critical Illness
Narcotics
Pain Management
Infusion Pumps
Critical Care
Nursing
Hemodynamics
Safety
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Use of patient-controlled analgesia with critically ill patients : a risk/benefit analysis. / Stanik, J. A.

In: AACN clinical issues in critical care nursing, Vol. 2, No. 4, 11.1991, p. 741-747.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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