Use of growth hormone for prevention or treatment of effects of aging

S. Mitchell Harman, Marc R. Blackman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Decreases in growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I, estrogen deficiency in women, diminished testosterone in men, and loss of lean body mass, increased fat, and other changes consistent with hormone deficiencies occur during aging. Treatment of nonelderly GH-deficient adults with recombinant human GH (rhGH) improves body composition, muscle strength, physical function, and bone density, and reduces blood cholesterol and cardiovascular disease risk, but is often accompanied by carpal tunnel syndrome, peripheral edema, joint pain and swelling, gynecomastia, glucose intolerance, and possibly increased cancer risk. Reports that rhGH augments lean body mass and reduces body fat in aged individuals increased use of rhGH to delay aging effects. However, clinically significant functional benefits, prolongation of youth, and life extension have not been demonstrated. Moreover, marketing of rhGH and other hormone supplements largely ignores adverse effects. Until more research has better defined the risk/benefit relationships, treatment of elderly individuals with rhGH should be confined to controlled research studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)652-658
Number of pages7
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume59
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Growth Hormone
Hormones
Life Support Care
Gynecomastia
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Glucose Intolerance
Human Growth Hormone
Hematologic Diseases
Arthralgia
Muscle Strength
Therapeutics
Life Expectancy
Body Composition
Marketing
Research
Bone Density
Testosterone
Adipose Tissue
Edema
Estrogens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging

Cite this

Use of growth hormone for prevention or treatment of effects of aging. / Harman, S. Mitchell; Blackman, Marc R.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 59, No. 7, 07.2004, p. 652-658.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e093a660eeaf4e6e97438195ffc0a5fe,
title = "Use of growth hormone for prevention or treatment of effects of aging",
abstract = "Decreases in growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I, estrogen deficiency in women, diminished testosterone in men, and loss of lean body mass, increased fat, and other changes consistent with hormone deficiencies occur during aging. Treatment of nonelderly GH-deficient adults with recombinant human GH (rhGH) improves body composition, muscle strength, physical function, and bone density, and reduces blood cholesterol and cardiovascular disease risk, but is often accompanied by carpal tunnel syndrome, peripheral edema, joint pain and swelling, gynecomastia, glucose intolerance, and possibly increased cancer risk. Reports that rhGH augments lean body mass and reduces body fat in aged individuals increased use of rhGH to delay aging effects. However, clinically significant functional benefits, prolongation of youth, and life extension have not been demonstrated. Moreover, marketing of rhGH and other hormone supplements largely ignores adverse effects. Until more research has better defined the risk/benefit relationships, treatment of elderly individuals with rhGH should be confined to controlled research studies.",
author = "Harman, {S. Mitchell} and Blackman, {Marc R.}",
year = "2004",
month = "7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "59",
pages = "652--658",
journal = "Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences",
issn = "1079-5006",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of growth hormone for prevention or treatment of effects of aging

AU - Harman, S. Mitchell

AU - Blackman, Marc R.

PY - 2004/7

Y1 - 2004/7

N2 - Decreases in growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I, estrogen deficiency in women, diminished testosterone in men, and loss of lean body mass, increased fat, and other changes consistent with hormone deficiencies occur during aging. Treatment of nonelderly GH-deficient adults with recombinant human GH (rhGH) improves body composition, muscle strength, physical function, and bone density, and reduces blood cholesterol and cardiovascular disease risk, but is often accompanied by carpal tunnel syndrome, peripheral edema, joint pain and swelling, gynecomastia, glucose intolerance, and possibly increased cancer risk. Reports that rhGH augments lean body mass and reduces body fat in aged individuals increased use of rhGH to delay aging effects. However, clinically significant functional benefits, prolongation of youth, and life extension have not been demonstrated. Moreover, marketing of rhGH and other hormone supplements largely ignores adverse effects. Until more research has better defined the risk/benefit relationships, treatment of elderly individuals with rhGH should be confined to controlled research studies.

AB - Decreases in growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I, estrogen deficiency in women, diminished testosterone in men, and loss of lean body mass, increased fat, and other changes consistent with hormone deficiencies occur during aging. Treatment of nonelderly GH-deficient adults with recombinant human GH (rhGH) improves body composition, muscle strength, physical function, and bone density, and reduces blood cholesterol and cardiovascular disease risk, but is often accompanied by carpal tunnel syndrome, peripheral edema, joint pain and swelling, gynecomastia, glucose intolerance, and possibly increased cancer risk. Reports that rhGH augments lean body mass and reduces body fat in aged individuals increased use of rhGH to delay aging effects. However, clinically significant functional benefits, prolongation of youth, and life extension have not been demonstrated. Moreover, marketing of rhGH and other hormone supplements largely ignores adverse effects. Until more research has better defined the risk/benefit relationships, treatment of elderly individuals with rhGH should be confined to controlled research studies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4043092705&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4043092705&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 15304529

AN - SCOPUS:4043092705

VL - 59

SP - 652

EP - 658

JO - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

IS - 7

ER -