Use of enhanced perinatal human immunodeficiency virus surveillance methods to assess antiretroviral use and perinatal human immunodeficiency virus transmission in the United States, 1999-2001

Norma S. Harris, Mary Glenn Fowler, Stephanie L. Sansom, Nan Ruffo, Margaret A. Lampe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Significant reductions in perinatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission have been demonstrated in which the HIV-infected mothers and their HIV-exposed infants receive prenatal, intrapartum, and neonatal antiretroviral therapy. Study Design: We used data that were collected through the Enhanced Perinatal Surveillance system for HIV-exposed singleton births that occurred 1999-2001 in 24 sites. Results: The overall infant infection rate for the 3 years was 4.7%. Compared with zidovudine monotherapy, those patients who received zidovudine with other drugs that included a protease inhibitor and those who received zidovudine and other drugs with no protease inhibitor were less likely to have an infected infant (adjusted odds ratio, 0.4 [95% CI, 0.3-0.07]; adjusted odds ratio, 0.5 [95% CI, 0.3-0.8], respectively). Conclusion: These data support the current treatment recommendations and show that infants were less likely to be infected when the mothers were given a prenatal antiretroviral therapy regimen that contained zidovudine with additional antiretroviral drugs with or without a protease inhibitor in addition to receiving antiretrovirals during delivery and neonatally.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S33-S41
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume197
Issue number3 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • antiretroviral
  • perinatal
  • surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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