Use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatric pain management service

A survey

Yuan Chi Lin, Anne C C Lee, Kathi J. Kemper, Charles B. Berde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To survey the use of complementary and alternative medical therapies by pediatric pain management services affiliated with major universities. Design. A telephone survey was conducted of pediatric anesthesia training programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States. The survey instrument included questions on the provision of complementary and alternative medical therapies in their pediatric pain programs. Results. Forty-three pediatric anesthesia fellowship programs (100%) responded to the survey. Thirty-eight institutions (86%) offered one or more complementary and alternative medical therapies for their patients. Those therapies included biofeedback (65%), guided imagery (49%), relaxation therapy (33%), massage (35%), hypnosis (44%), acupuncture (33%), art therapy (21%), and meditation (21%). Conclusions. This report documents trends in complementary and alternative medical therapies usage in the tertiary pediatric pain management service. There is a high prevalence in the integration of complementary and alternative medical therapies in pediatric pain management programs. Additional clinical research in the safety and efficacy in complementary and alternative medical therapies for pediatric pain management is urgently needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-458
Number of pages7
JournalPain Medicine
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pain Management
Complementary Therapies
Pediatrics
Anesthesia
Art Therapy
Relaxation Therapy
Graduate Medical Education
Meditation
Massage
Hypnosis
Accreditation
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Acupuncture
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telephone
Safety
Education
Pain
Research

Keywords

  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine
  • Pain Management
  • Pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatric pain management service : A survey. / Lin, Yuan Chi; Lee, Anne C C; Kemper, Kathi J.; Berde, Charles B.

In: Pain Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 6, 11.2005, p. 452-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, Yuan Chi ; Lee, Anne C C ; Kemper, Kathi J. ; Berde, Charles B. / Use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatric pain management service : A survey. In: Pain Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 452-458.
@article{acb06dc9ea7b411db04e15721ba879ee,
title = "Use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatric pain management service: A survey",
abstract = "Objective. To survey the use of complementary and alternative medical therapies by pediatric pain management services affiliated with major universities. Design. A telephone survey was conducted of pediatric anesthesia training programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States. The survey instrument included questions on the provision of complementary and alternative medical therapies in their pediatric pain programs. Results. Forty-three pediatric anesthesia fellowship programs (100{\%}) responded to the survey. Thirty-eight institutions (86{\%}) offered one or more complementary and alternative medical therapies for their patients. Those therapies included biofeedback (65{\%}), guided imagery (49{\%}), relaxation therapy (33{\%}), massage (35{\%}), hypnosis (44{\%}), acupuncture (33{\%}), art therapy (21{\%}), and meditation (21{\%}). Conclusions. This report documents trends in complementary and alternative medical therapies usage in the tertiary pediatric pain management service. There is a high prevalence in the integration of complementary and alternative medical therapies in pediatric pain management programs. Additional clinical research in the safety and efficacy in complementary and alternative medical therapies for pediatric pain management is urgently needed.",
keywords = "Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Pain Management, Pediatric",
author = "Lin, {Yuan Chi} and Lee, {Anne C C} and Kemper, {Kathi J.} and Berde, {Charles B.}",
year = "2005",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1111/j.1526-4637.2005.00071.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "452--458",
journal = "Pain Medicine",
issn = "1526-2375",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatric pain management service

T2 - A survey

AU - Lin, Yuan Chi

AU - Lee, Anne C C

AU - Kemper, Kathi J.

AU - Berde, Charles B.

PY - 2005/11

Y1 - 2005/11

N2 - Objective. To survey the use of complementary and alternative medical therapies by pediatric pain management services affiliated with major universities. Design. A telephone survey was conducted of pediatric anesthesia training programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States. The survey instrument included questions on the provision of complementary and alternative medical therapies in their pediatric pain programs. Results. Forty-three pediatric anesthesia fellowship programs (100%) responded to the survey. Thirty-eight institutions (86%) offered one or more complementary and alternative medical therapies for their patients. Those therapies included biofeedback (65%), guided imagery (49%), relaxation therapy (33%), massage (35%), hypnosis (44%), acupuncture (33%), art therapy (21%), and meditation (21%). Conclusions. This report documents trends in complementary and alternative medical therapies usage in the tertiary pediatric pain management service. There is a high prevalence in the integration of complementary and alternative medical therapies in pediatric pain management programs. Additional clinical research in the safety and efficacy in complementary and alternative medical therapies for pediatric pain management is urgently needed.

AB - Objective. To survey the use of complementary and alternative medical therapies by pediatric pain management services affiliated with major universities. Design. A telephone survey was conducted of pediatric anesthesia training programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the United States. The survey instrument included questions on the provision of complementary and alternative medical therapies in their pediatric pain programs. Results. Forty-three pediatric anesthesia fellowship programs (100%) responded to the survey. Thirty-eight institutions (86%) offered one or more complementary and alternative medical therapies for their patients. Those therapies included biofeedback (65%), guided imagery (49%), relaxation therapy (33%), massage (35%), hypnosis (44%), acupuncture (33%), art therapy (21%), and meditation (21%). Conclusions. This report documents trends in complementary and alternative medical therapies usage in the tertiary pediatric pain management service. There is a high prevalence in the integration of complementary and alternative medical therapies in pediatric pain management programs. Additional clinical research in the safety and efficacy in complementary and alternative medical therapies for pediatric pain management is urgently needed.

KW - Complementary and Alternative Medicine

KW - Pain Management

KW - Pediatric

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=30944441612&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=30944441612&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2005.00071.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2005.00071.x

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 452

EP - 458

JO - Pain Medicine

JF - Pain Medicine

SN - 1526-2375

IS - 6

ER -