Use of collateral airways to assess airway reactivity

D. H. Corddry, R. A. Sauder, G. G. Weinmann, C. A. Hirshman, W. Mitzner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We investigated the correlation between collateral airway reactivity and other indexes of lung reactivity in response to aerosol and intravenous (iv) challenges. In four anesthetized mongrel dogs, we measured the peripheral airway resistance (Rp) to gas flow out of a wedged lung segment in different lobes on multiple occasions. We obtained dose-response curves of peripheral airways challenged with iv histamine or aerosols through the bronchoscope. During the same iv bolus challenge, whole lung airway pressure (Paw) responses to histamine were also measured. On separate occasions, changes in lung resistance (RL) were measured after the whole lung was challenged with a histamine aerosol. Reactivity was assessed from the dose-response curves for Rp and RL as the PD50 (dose required to produce a 50% increase); for changes in Paw we calculated the PD15 (dose required to produce a 15% increase over baseline). Results for Rp showed considerably more variability among different lobes in a given animal with the aerosol challenge through the bronchoscope than with the iv challenge. With aerosol challenge there were no significant differences in the mean PD50 for Rp among any of the animals. However, with the iv challenge two of the dogs showed significant differences from the others in reactivity assessed with Rp (P < 0.01). Moreover, the differences found in the peripheral airways with iv challenge reflected differences found in whole lung reactivity assessed with either iv challenge (Paw vs. Rp, r2 = 0.96) or whole lung aerosol challenge (RL vs. Rp, r2 = 0.84). We conclude that the measurement of the collateral resistance response to iv challenge may provide a sensitive method for assessing airway reactivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-356
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of applied physiology
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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