Use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate addiction. I. Physiologic and behavioral effects during a rapid dose induction

Rolley E. Johnson, Edward J. Cone, Jack E. Henningfield, Paul J. Fudala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A new, rapid dose-induction procedure was used in the evaluation of buprenorphine hydrochloride (buprenorphine) as a treatment for opiate dependence. Nineteen heroin-dependent men were given buprenorphine sublingually in ascending daily doses of 2, 4, and 8 mg and then maintained on 8 mg daily. The observations of the transition from heroin to buprenorphine for the first 4 days are described. During this period, subjects reported significantly elevated ratings of "good effects" and feelings of "overall well-being" and decreased ratings of "overall sickness." Data from subscales of the Addiction Research Center Inventory indicated increasing euphoria and decreasing dysphoria and sedation after buprenorphine administration. Subjects and observers consistently identified buprenorphine as an opiate and not as an opiate antagonist. These findings indicate that a rapid dose induction with buprenorphine is acceptable to heroin-dependent persons and that it causes minimal withdrawal symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-343
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume46
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1989

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Opioid-Related Disorders
Buprenorphine
Opiate Alkaloids
Heroin
Therapeutics
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
Emotions
Equipment and Supplies
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate addiction. I. Physiologic and behavioral effects during a rapid dose induction. / Johnson, Rolley E.; Cone, Edward J.; Henningfield, Jack E.; Fudala, Paul J.

In: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 46, No. 3, 09.1989, p. 335-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, Rolley E. ; Cone, Edward J. ; Henningfield, Jack E. ; Fudala, Paul J. / Use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate addiction. I. Physiologic and behavioral effects during a rapid dose induction. In: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 1989 ; Vol. 46, No. 3. pp. 335-343.
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