Use of an outpatient medical record audit to achieve educational objectives - Changes in residents' performances over six years

David E Kern, William L. Harris, Bradley O. Boekeloo, Lee Randol Barker, Patricia Hogeland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective:To evaluate the effectiveness of a process whereby a faculty-resident committee annually audits outpatient record keeping and preventive care practices and provides feedback to resident physicians. Design:Pre- and postfeedback audits with interventions and observations repeated over six consecutive academic years. Setting:The adult primary care practice of housestaff in a university-affiliated hospital. Subjects:All 139 physicians in an internal medicine residency program from 1981-82 through 1986-87, of whom 37 were present for three consecutive years. Intervention:Each year, residents were given individualized, detailed, typewritten feedback based on audits of their outpatient records. Measurements and main results:Each resident physician had a minimum of four (mean 5.2) outpatient records per year audited against standards for record-keeping practices and the provision of preventive care. Overall performance scores for each resident audit improved from a mean of 39.7±12.3 (SD) in 1981-82 to a mean of 58.5±14.1 (SD) in 1986-87 (possible range 0 to 100, observed range 9.4 to 86.6). The overall performance scores of individual residents, who received two cycles of feedback, improved an average of 11.5 (95% confidence limits 7.6, 15.3), from a mean of 48.4±11.4 (SD) during their first year of residency to 59.8±13.9 (SD) during their third year. General (primary care) and traditional-track residents improved at similar rates, although mean performance scores were consistently higher for general than for traditional-track residents. Analysis of variance revealed that all changes and differences were statistically significant. Conclusions:An ongoing chart audit and feedback system can be associated with improvements both in the performance of individual residents and in the long-term performance of a residency program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-224
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1990

Fingerprint

Medical Audit
Medical Records
Outpatients
Internship and Residency
Preventive Medicine
Physicians
Primary Health Care
Internal Medicine
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • feedback
  • internship and residency
  • medical audit
  • medical records
  • primary health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Use of an outpatient medical record audit to achieve educational objectives - Changes in residents' performances over six years. / Kern, David E; Harris, William L.; Boekeloo, Bradley O.; Barker, Lee Randol; Hogeland, Patricia.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 3, 05.1990, p. 218-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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