Use of an intravascular temperature control catheter for rewarming of hypothermic trauma patients with ongoing hemorrhagic shock after combined damage control thoracotomy and laparotomy: A case series

Byron C. Drumheller, Deborah M. Stein, Thomas M. Scalea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Correction of hypothermia is a key component of the resuscitation of critically injured patients with hemorrhagic shock who require damage control surgery. External rewarming methods may not be sufficient in this population, while extracorporeal techniques lack widespread feasibility. Intravascular catheter-based temperature modulation is increasingly being employed in different critically ill patient populations but has not been described as part of a damage control resuscitation strategy in trauma patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients admitted to our multi-trauma intensive care unit from July 1, 2015 – December 31, 2017 in whom an intravascular temperature control catheter (IVTCC) was employed for rewarming from hypothermia during the immediate postoperative resuscitation of continued hemorrhage after undergoing combined damage control thoracotomy and laparotomy for trauma. All patients received baseline treatment with active external rewarming modalities and inline fluid/blood warmers. Core temperature values over the first 24 h of hospital admission were analyzed. Efficacy (rewarming rate) and safety (associated adverse events) of the IVTCC system were determined. Results: Three patients (age 22 ± 4.6, 100% male, 100% torso gunshot wounds with prehospital cardiac arrest) meeting the inclusion criteria were treated with the IVTCC system during the study period. Temperature at the start of rewarming using the IVTCC ranged from 30.1 to 35.5 °C. Despite ongoing severe hemorrhagic shock (24-hour ICU blood product requirement: 104 ± 44 units), a mean rewarming rate of 1.04 ± 0.63°C/hour was achieved. One patient suffered an uncomplicated catheter-associated deep vein thrombosis. Two of the 3 patients survived to hospital discharge with intact cognitive function. Conclusions: Use of an IVTCC may be a minimally-invasive, practical, and effective method for rewarming critically ill trauma patients with ongoing hemorrhagic shock after multi-cavitary damage control surgery. Further studies are needed to compare this technology with currently available rewarming methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1668-1674
Number of pages7
JournalInjury
Volume49
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Damage control surgery
  • Hemorrhagic shock
  • Hypothermia
  • Intravascular temperature control catheter
  • Rewarming

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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