Use of a risk quiz to predict infection for sexually transmitted infections: A retrospective analysis of acceptability and positivity

Charlotte A. Gaydos, Mary Jett-Goheen, Mathilda Barnes, Laura DIze, Perry Barnes, Yu Hsiang Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Individuals who are sexually active may want to make a decision as to whether they are at risk for having a sexually transmitted infection (STI) such as Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis. Our goal was to develop and evaluate a simple self-taken sexual risk quiz for participants, ordering an online STI self-collection test kit to determine whether the score predicted infection status. Methods As part of the IWantTheKit programme for home sample self-collection for STIs, 2010-2013, the programme asked male and female users to voluntarily take a risk quiz. The six-question quiz was about risk behaviour and included an age question. Data analyses were stratified by gender as determined a priori. Scores 0-10 were stratified into risk groups for each gender based on similar risk score-specific STI prevalence. Retrospective analyses were performed to assess whether risk group predicted aggregate STI positivity. Urogenital/rectal mailed samples were tested by nucleic acid amplification tests. Results More females (N=836) than males (N=558) provided voluntary risk scores. The percentage of eligible participants who submitted scores was 43.9% for both females and males. There was a higher STI infection rate in females (14.0%) than in males (7.0%) for having any STI ( p<0.001). Multivariate logistic analysis for females, which controlled for age and race, demonstrated that a higher risk score group independently predicted risk for having an STI (OR of 2.2 for risk scores 5-7 and 4.2 OR for scores of 8-10). For males, the multivariate model, which controlled for race, indicated that no risk score group was associated having an STI. Conclusions Results of a participant's own sexual risk quiz score independently predicted STI positivity for women, but not for men. Further study of this simple risk quiz is required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-48
Number of pages5
JournalSexually transmitted infections
Volume92
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

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