Use of a primary carotid stenting technique does not affect perioperative outcomes

Caitlin Hicks, Besma Nejim, Tammam Obeid, Satinderjit S. Locham, Mahmoud B. Malas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Primary carotid stenting (PCS) has been shown to be feasible and safe in small series, but real-world outcomes in a large multicenter data set have yet to be explored. We aimed to compare outcomes for PCS (PCS+) vs conventional carotid artery stenting (CAS) with angioplasty (PCS-) using a national database. Methods: We analyzed all CAS cases in the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) database (2005-2016) using univariable and multivariable logistic regression to assess the effect of PCS on outcomes. The primary end point was a composite of stroke/death occurring within 30 days. Results: The study included 10,074 patients (mean age, 69.5 ± 9.9 years; 64% male). The composite end point occurred in 3.5% of cases (stroke, 2.4%; death, 1.5%). PCS was used in 688 (6.8%) patients. On univariable analysis, stroke/death occurred more frequently with PCS+ vs PCS- (5.2% vs 3.4%; P = .01). However, this difference was mitigated after adjusting for baseline group differences (odds ratio [OR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-1.83; P = .55). PCS also had no significant effect on the primary composite end point on adjusted analysis stratified by symptom status (asymptomatic: OR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.39-2.48]; symptomatic: OR, 1.19 [95% CI 0.66-2.06]) or among patients undergoing CAS with embolic protection (OR, 1.54 [95% CI, 0.92-2.57]). Patients undergoing CAS without embolic protection had a significantly higher risk of stroke/death regardless of the stenting technique used (OR, 3.97 [95% CI, 2.47-6.37]). Conclusions: PCS is associated with a similar risk of stroke and death compared with conventional CAS with angioplasty. The use of an embolic protection device is essential to good outcomes with both techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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