Use and Perceptions of Electronic Cigarettes Among Caregivers of Infants and Children with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease associated with prematurity and very low birth weight. These children have increased morbidity and mortality associated with environmental exposures, such as cigarette smoke. As of 2015, 3.5% of US adults report current use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) with use increasing over time. Perceptions of e-cigarette harm are poorly understood, and there are no data among caregivers of children with BPD. Methods: Subjects (n = 119) in this study were recruited from the outpatient Johns Hopkins BPD Clinic from January to October 2015. Parental use and perceptions of e-cigarettes were assessed using a questionnaire adapted from the 2012 National Youth Tobacco Survey. Chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression analyses were used to assess characteristics associated with e-cigarette use and caregiver perceptions. Results: A total of 119 caregivers completed the questionnaire with 8% reporting current e-cigarette use and 14% reporting current conventional cigarette use. Households who used conventional cigarettes were eleven times more likely to also use e-cigarettes [odds ratio: 11.3 (95% confidence interval: 2.6-48.2); P = 0.001]. Households reporting conventional cigarette use were less likely to perceive e-cigarette emissions as harmful compared with nonsmoking households. Perceptions of e-cigarette emissions as less harmful to others were associated with conventional cigarette use, current e-cigarette use, and having public insurance. Conclusions: Among our population, both conventional cigarette and e-cigarette smoking households had decreased perceptions of harm regarding e-cigarette emissions to self and others. Our study suggests that e-cigarette use among caregivers is an underrecognized environmental exposure in households of children with BPD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-147
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Caregivers
Tobacco Products
Environmental Exposure
Electronic Cigarettes
Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Chi-Square Distribution
Insurance
Smoke
Lung Diseases
Tobacco
Chronic Disease
Outpatients
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • bronchopulmonary dysplasia
  • Electronic cigarette
  • emission
  • perceived risk
  • prematurity
  • preterm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

@article{b2824ec02d7e4f54935db8dce28f57b9,
title = "Use and Perceptions of Electronic Cigarettes Among Caregivers of Infants and Children with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia",
abstract = "Background: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease associated with prematurity and very low birth weight. These children have increased morbidity and mortality associated with environmental exposures, such as cigarette smoke. As of 2015, 3.5{\%} of US adults report current use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) with use increasing over time. Perceptions of e-cigarette harm are poorly understood, and there are no data among caregivers of children with BPD. Methods: Subjects (n = 119) in this study were recruited from the outpatient Johns Hopkins BPD Clinic from January to October 2015. Parental use and perceptions of e-cigarettes were assessed using a questionnaire adapted from the 2012 National Youth Tobacco Survey. Chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression analyses were used to assess characteristics associated with e-cigarette use and caregiver perceptions. Results: A total of 119 caregivers completed the questionnaire with 8{\%} reporting current e-cigarette use and 14{\%} reporting current conventional cigarette use. Households who used conventional cigarettes were eleven times more likely to also use e-cigarettes [odds ratio: 11.3 (95{\%} confidence interval: 2.6-48.2); P = 0.001]. Households reporting conventional cigarette use were less likely to perceive e-cigarette emissions as harmful compared with nonsmoking households. Perceptions of e-cigarette emissions as less harmful to others were associated with conventional cigarette use, current e-cigarette use, and having public insurance. Conclusions: Among our population, both conventional cigarette and e-cigarette smoking households had decreased perceptions of harm regarding e-cigarette emissions to self and others. Our study suggests that e-cigarette use among caregivers is an underrecognized environmental exposure in households of children with BPD.",
keywords = "bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Electronic cigarette, emission, perceived risk, prematurity, preterm",
author = "Dayna Mazza and McGrath-Morrow, {Sharon A} and Michael Collaco",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/ped.2017.0771",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "141--147",
journal = "Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology",
issn = "2151-321X",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use and Perceptions of Electronic Cigarettes Among Caregivers of Infants and Children with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

AU - Mazza, Dayna

AU - McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A

AU - Collaco, Michael

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - Background: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease associated with prematurity and very low birth weight. These children have increased morbidity and mortality associated with environmental exposures, such as cigarette smoke. As of 2015, 3.5% of US adults report current use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) with use increasing over time. Perceptions of e-cigarette harm are poorly understood, and there are no data among caregivers of children with BPD. Methods: Subjects (n = 119) in this study were recruited from the outpatient Johns Hopkins BPD Clinic from January to October 2015. Parental use and perceptions of e-cigarettes were assessed using a questionnaire adapted from the 2012 National Youth Tobacco Survey. Chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression analyses were used to assess characteristics associated with e-cigarette use and caregiver perceptions. Results: A total of 119 caregivers completed the questionnaire with 8% reporting current e-cigarette use and 14% reporting current conventional cigarette use. Households who used conventional cigarettes were eleven times more likely to also use e-cigarettes [odds ratio: 11.3 (95% confidence interval: 2.6-48.2); P = 0.001]. Households reporting conventional cigarette use were less likely to perceive e-cigarette emissions as harmful compared with nonsmoking households. Perceptions of e-cigarette emissions as less harmful to others were associated with conventional cigarette use, current e-cigarette use, and having public insurance. Conclusions: Among our population, both conventional cigarette and e-cigarette smoking households had decreased perceptions of harm regarding e-cigarette emissions to self and others. Our study suggests that e-cigarette use among caregivers is an underrecognized environmental exposure in households of children with BPD.

AB - Background: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease associated with prematurity and very low birth weight. These children have increased morbidity and mortality associated with environmental exposures, such as cigarette smoke. As of 2015, 3.5% of US adults report current use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) with use increasing over time. Perceptions of e-cigarette harm are poorly understood, and there are no data among caregivers of children with BPD. Methods: Subjects (n = 119) in this study were recruited from the outpatient Johns Hopkins BPD Clinic from January to October 2015. Parental use and perceptions of e-cigarettes were assessed using a questionnaire adapted from the 2012 National Youth Tobacco Survey. Chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression analyses were used to assess characteristics associated with e-cigarette use and caregiver perceptions. Results: A total of 119 caregivers completed the questionnaire with 8% reporting current e-cigarette use and 14% reporting current conventional cigarette use. Households who used conventional cigarettes were eleven times more likely to also use e-cigarettes [odds ratio: 11.3 (95% confidence interval: 2.6-48.2); P = 0.001]. Households reporting conventional cigarette use were less likely to perceive e-cigarette emissions as harmful compared with nonsmoking households. Perceptions of e-cigarette emissions as less harmful to others were associated with conventional cigarette use, current e-cigarette use, and having public insurance. Conclusions: Among our population, both conventional cigarette and e-cigarette smoking households had decreased perceptions of harm regarding e-cigarette emissions to self and others. Our study suggests that e-cigarette use among caregivers is an underrecognized environmental exposure in households of children with BPD.

KW - bronchopulmonary dysplasia

KW - Electronic cigarette

KW - emission

KW - perceived risk

KW - prematurity

KW - preterm

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85042107080&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85042107080&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/ped.2017.0771

DO - 10.1089/ped.2017.0771

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85042107080

VL - 30

SP - 141

EP - 147

JO - Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology

JF - Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology

SN - 2151-321X

IS - 3

ER -