USA300 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (USA300 MRSA) colonization and the risk of MRSA infection in residents of extended-care facilities

S. M. Shurland, O. C. Stine, R. A. Venezia, M. Zhan, J. P. Furuno, R. R. Miller, M. C. Roghmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To examine the pathogenesis of USA300 MRSA infection in long-term care residents, we performed a retrospective cohort study of 1691 adult residents of two extended-care facilities from 2003 to 2007 to assess whether the risk of subsequent MRSA infection is higher in USA300 MRSA-colonized residents compared to non-colonized residents or non-USA300 MRSA colonized residents. Six per cent of residents were colonized with USA300 MRSA; 12% of residents were colonized with non-USA300 MRSA; and 101 residents developed MRSA infection. The risk of infection was twofold higher in residents colonized with USA300 MRSA compared to residents not colonized with MRSA [adjusted hazard ratio 2·3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·1-4·5]. The risk of infection in USA300 MRSA-colonized residents was similar to USA300 MRSA non-colonized residents (relative risk 1·1, 95% CI 0·5-2·3). Our findings show that colonization with USA300 MRSA increases the risk of MRSA infection suggesting a similar pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-399
Number of pages10
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume140
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Skilled Nursing Facilities
Methicillin Resistance
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Infection
Confidence Intervals
Long-Term Care
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections
  • methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

USA300 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (USA300 MRSA) colonization and the risk of MRSA infection in residents of extended-care facilities. / Shurland, S. M.; Stine, O. C.; Venezia, R. A.; Zhan, M.; Furuno, J. P.; Miller, R. R.; Roghmann, M. C.

In: Epidemiology and Infection, Vol. 140, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 390-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shurland, S. M. ; Stine, O. C. ; Venezia, R. A. ; Zhan, M. ; Furuno, J. P. ; Miller, R. R. ; Roghmann, M. C. / USA300 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (USA300 MRSA) colonization and the risk of MRSA infection in residents of extended-care facilities. In: Epidemiology and Infection. 2012 ; Vol. 140, No. 3. pp. 390-399.
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