US dermatopathology fellows career survey

2004-2005

Gary Goldenberg, Manisha Patel, Omar P. Sangueza, Fabian Camacho, Vishal C. Khanna, Steven R. Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Graduates of a dermatopathology fellowship may choose an academic career or a career in private practice. Objective: To assess career plans of 2004-2005 dermatopathology fellows and to correlate an academic career choice with factors identified in a national survey of US dermatopathology fellowship programs. Methods: Surveys were mailed to 60 trainees at 45 dermatopathology fellowship programs across the United States. Pearson correlation analysis was used to interpret the data. Results: Thirty-five surveys (58% response rate) were returned. Top five factors that correlated positively with an academic career choice were graduating from a non-US medical school, performing research during fellowship, importance of research in a career decision, completing a dermatology residency and publication requirement in fellowship. Top five factors that correlated positively with choosing a career in private practice were loan debt, importance of salary/earning potential, importance of job availability, being married and having an employed spouse. Limitations: Study limitations are a small sample size and potential response bias. Conclusion: Supporting research during fellowship, supporting applicants who completed a dermatology residency or graduated from a foreign medical school, providing loan forgiveness/repayment and increasing earning/salary potential in academic practice may encourage more young physicians to join the academic workforce.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-489
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Cutaneous Pathology
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Career Choice
Private Practice
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Internship and Residency
Dermatology
Medical Schools
Research
Forgiveness
Spouses
Sample Size
Publications
Surveys and Questionnaires
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Goldenberg, G., Patel, M., Sangueza, O. P., Camacho, F., Khanna, V. C., & Feldman, S. R. (2007). US dermatopathology fellows career survey: 2004-2005. Journal of Cutaneous Pathology, 34(6), 487-489. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0560.2006.00643.x

US dermatopathology fellows career survey : 2004-2005. / Goldenberg, Gary; Patel, Manisha; Sangueza, Omar P.; Camacho, Fabian; Khanna, Vishal C.; Feldman, Steven R.

In: Journal of Cutaneous Pathology, Vol. 34, No. 6, 06.2007, p. 487-489.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldenberg, G, Patel, M, Sangueza, OP, Camacho, F, Khanna, VC & Feldman, SR 2007, 'US dermatopathology fellows career survey: 2004-2005', Journal of Cutaneous Pathology, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 487-489. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0560.2006.00643.x
Goldenberg, Gary ; Patel, Manisha ; Sangueza, Omar P. ; Camacho, Fabian ; Khanna, Vishal C. ; Feldman, Steven R. / US dermatopathology fellows career survey : 2004-2005. In: Journal of Cutaneous Pathology. 2007 ; Vol. 34, No. 6. pp. 487-489.
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