Urbanization, Dengue, and the Health Transition: Anthropological Contributions to International Health

Carl Kendall, Patricia Hudelson, Elli Leontsini, Peter John Winch, Linda Lloyd, Fernando Cruz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A host of resurgent diseases, many in newly created urban environments, challenges the assumptions underlying anthropological contributions to international public health programs. Past programs validated local knowledge about acute and well‐known disease conditions and encouraged self‐help and participatory approaches to respond to these problems. This article discusses the changing picture of health conditions in urban settings by examining local responses to one problem, dengue hemorrhagic fever, in a new program designed to test several earlier assumptions. 1991 American Anthropological Association

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-268
Number of pages12
JournalMedical Anthropology Quarterly
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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Health Transition
Urbanization
Anthropology
Dengue
urbanization
Severe Dengue
Health
Acute Disease
health
Disease
Public Health
public health
International Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Urbanization, Dengue, and the Health Transition : Anthropological Contributions to International Health. / Kendall, Carl; Hudelson, Patricia; Leontsini, Elli; Winch, Peter John; Lloyd, Linda; Cruz, Fernando.

In: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1991, p. 257-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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