Urban black adolescents who obtain contraceptive services before or after their first pregnancy. Psychosocial factors and contraceptive use

Ellen W. Freeman, Karl Rickels, George R. Huggins, Celso Ramon Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper compares three groups of urban black teenagers at their enrollment in a contraceptive program and at a one-year follow-up. The groups comprise 263 never-pregnant, postabortion, and postpartum teens ages ≤ 17 years at their initial family planning visit. Self-report questionnaires examined attitudes and information about pregnancy and contraceptive use, sources of contraceptive information, sexual and contraceptive experience, family and partner support for contraceptive use, and demographic background factors. Emotional, personality, and psychosocial factors were assessed with standard measures. Age, partner relationships, and items relating to the mother's communication about contraception and pregnancy were significant variables in the outcome of never-pregnant and delivery of pregnancy. Self-esteem was highest in the never-pregnant group. Personality factors, emotional distress, and social adjustment scores were in the normal ranges and did not differ between the groups. Contraceptive use at follow-up was most consistent in the never-pregnant group. These data suggest the need for earlier family involvement in educating and guiding teens together with access to contraceptive services in preventing unwanted adolescent pregnancies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-190
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health Care
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1984
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Contraceptive use
  • Family planning
  • Psychosocial factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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