Unusual supernumerary chromosomes: types encountered in a referred population, and high incidence of associated maternal chromosome abnormalities

Judith Stamberg, G. H. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a 6-year period 128 patients with supernumerary autosomes were identified in our laboratory. The majority had "primary" trisomy, but 19 (15%) had extra, unusual chromosomes, not just a normal chromosome present in an extra copy. Of these, 18 were complex and did not resemble any one part of the standard chromosome complement. There was a preponderance of females among the 19 cases. Chromosome analysis of the parents in the 14 most recent cases revealed maternal chromosome abnormalities in 11 (79%). Of these 11, eight mothers had balanced reciprocal translocations; nondisjunction led to the smaller of their translocation chromosomes being passed on as the supernumerary chromosome in their offspring. Thus, nondisjunction of maternal translocations accounts for a major proportion of the unusual supernumerary chromosomes found by our laboratory. Advanced maternal age was noted in this group of mothers. Three mothers had supernumerary chromosomes themselves. We conclude that unusual supernumerary chromosomes (1) are not rare among patients referred for chromosome studies; (2) are generally not simple products of breakage; (3) are very frequently the result of malsegregation of a balanced maternal reciprocal translocation; and (4) are very difficult to characterize unless a balanced parental translocation is identified. Parental karyotypes should be obtained whenever a patient has an extra, unusual chromosome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-144
Number of pages5
JournalHuman genetics
Volume72
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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