Unplanned ICU Admission is Associated With Worse Clinical Outcomes in Geriatric Trauma Patients

Hillary E. Mulvey, Richard D. Haslam, Adam D. Laytin, Carrie A. Diamond, Carrie A. Sims

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Geriatric trauma patients who require an unplanned ICU admission (UIA) may experience worse outcomes. As such, the American College of Surgeons initiated the Trauma Quality Improvement Program which tracks UIA as a quality benchmark. We sought to determine the overall rate and impact of UIA in our geriatric trauma population and to identify predictive risk factors. Methods: All geriatric trauma patients (≥65) admitted to an urban, level I trauma center from January 2012 to June 2018 were identified. A retrospectively collected administrative database was queried for demographics, comorbidities, injury characteristics, and outcomes. UIA were identified and medical records were queried. Univariate analysis followed by binary logistic regression analysis were performed (P < 0.05 = significant). Results: Of the 2923 geriatric patients identified, 95 (3.3%) patients experienced UIA, most commonly secondary to respiratory (34.7%) and cardiac (22.1%) events. Patients with UIA were older (81 versus 78, P = 0.04), and had higher injury severity score (10 versus 9, P < 0.01) and Charlson comorbidity indices (5 versus 4, P = 0.02). On logistic regression, age (OR 1.027, P = 0.04) and injury severity score (OR 1.032, P < 0.01) were predictive of unplanned ICU admission. Of the UIA, 69.4% were readmissions, or “bounce backs”. Patients initially admitted to the ICU had 2.5 increased odds of requiring UIA. Patients with UIA experienced longer hospital stays (15 versus 5, P < 0.01), more days in the ICU (6 versus 1, P < 0.01), and higher rates of mortality (11.6% versus 5.0%, P = 0.02). Conclusions: Despite relatively low injury severity, geriatric trauma patients requiring UIA have a significant increase in morbidity and mortality. Those initially admitted to the ICU are at especially high risk for UIA, suggesting the benefit of strategies to provide an extra layer of care post-ICU.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-21
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume245
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Geriatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Injury Severity Score
Comorbidity
Logistic Models
Benchmarking
Mortality
Trauma Centers
Quality Improvement
Medical Records
Length of Stay
Regression Analysis
Demography
Databases
Morbidity
Population

Keywords

  • Geriatric
  • Injury severity
  • Intensive care unit
  • Readmission
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Unplanned ICU Admission is Associated With Worse Clinical Outcomes in Geriatric Trauma Patients. / Mulvey, Hillary E.; Haslam, Richard D.; Laytin, Adam D.; Diamond, Carrie A.; Sims, Carrie A.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 245, 01.2020, p. 13-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mulvey, Hillary E. ; Haslam, Richard D. ; Laytin, Adam D. ; Diamond, Carrie A. ; Sims, Carrie A. / Unplanned ICU Admission is Associated With Worse Clinical Outcomes in Geriatric Trauma Patients. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2020 ; Vol. 245. pp. 13-21.
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abstract = "Background: Geriatric trauma patients who require an unplanned ICU admission (UIA) may experience worse outcomes. As such, the American College of Surgeons initiated the Trauma Quality Improvement Program which tracks UIA as a quality benchmark. We sought to determine the overall rate and impact of UIA in our geriatric trauma population and to identify predictive risk factors. Methods: All geriatric trauma patients (≥65) admitted to an urban, level I trauma center from January 2012 to June 2018 were identified. A retrospectively collected administrative database was queried for demographics, comorbidities, injury characteristics, and outcomes. UIA were identified and medical records were queried. Univariate analysis followed by binary logistic regression analysis were performed (P < 0.05 = significant). Results: Of the 2923 geriatric patients identified, 95 (3.3{\%}) patients experienced UIA, most commonly secondary to respiratory (34.7{\%}) and cardiac (22.1{\%}) events. Patients with UIA were older (81 versus 78, P = 0.04), and had higher injury severity score (10 versus 9, P < 0.01) and Charlson comorbidity indices (5 versus 4, P = 0.02). On logistic regression, age (OR 1.027, P = 0.04) and injury severity score (OR 1.032, P < 0.01) were predictive of unplanned ICU admission. Of the UIA, 69.4{\%} were readmissions, or “bounce backs”. Patients initially admitted to the ICU had 2.5 increased odds of requiring UIA. Patients with UIA experienced longer hospital stays (15 versus 5, P < 0.01), more days in the ICU (6 versus 1, P < 0.01), and higher rates of mortality (11.6{\%} versus 5.0{\%}, P = 0.02). Conclusions: Despite relatively low injury severity, geriatric trauma patients requiring UIA have a significant increase in morbidity and mortality. Those initially admitted to the ICU are at especially high risk for UIA, suggesting the benefit of strategies to provide an extra layer of care post-ICU.",
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AB - Background: Geriatric trauma patients who require an unplanned ICU admission (UIA) may experience worse outcomes. As such, the American College of Surgeons initiated the Trauma Quality Improvement Program which tracks UIA as a quality benchmark. We sought to determine the overall rate and impact of UIA in our geriatric trauma population and to identify predictive risk factors. Methods: All geriatric trauma patients (≥65) admitted to an urban, level I trauma center from January 2012 to June 2018 were identified. A retrospectively collected administrative database was queried for demographics, comorbidities, injury characteristics, and outcomes. UIA were identified and medical records were queried. Univariate analysis followed by binary logistic regression analysis were performed (P < 0.05 = significant). Results: Of the 2923 geriatric patients identified, 95 (3.3%) patients experienced UIA, most commonly secondary to respiratory (34.7%) and cardiac (22.1%) events. Patients with UIA were older (81 versus 78, P = 0.04), and had higher injury severity score (10 versus 9, P < 0.01) and Charlson comorbidity indices (5 versus 4, P = 0.02). On logistic regression, age (OR 1.027, P = 0.04) and injury severity score (OR 1.032, P < 0.01) were predictive of unplanned ICU admission. Of the UIA, 69.4% were readmissions, or “bounce backs”. Patients initially admitted to the ICU had 2.5 increased odds of requiring UIA. Patients with UIA experienced longer hospital stays (15 versus 5, P < 0.01), more days in the ICU (6 versus 1, P < 0.01), and higher rates of mortality (11.6% versus 5.0%, P = 0.02). Conclusions: Despite relatively low injury severity, geriatric trauma patients requiring UIA have a significant increase in morbidity and mortality. Those initially admitted to the ICU are at especially high risk for UIA, suggesting the benefit of strategies to provide an extra layer of care post-ICU.

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KW - Intensive care unit

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