Unpacking the performance of a mobile health information messaging program for mothers (MomConnect) in South Africa: Evidence on program reach and messaging exposure

Amnesty E Lefevre, Pierre Dane, Charles J. Copley, Cara Pienaar, Annie Neo Parsons, Matt Engelhard, David Woods, Marcha Bekker, Peter Benjamin, Yogan Pillay, Peter Barron, Christopher John Seebregts, Diwakar Mohan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite calls to address broader evidence gaps in linking digital technologies to outcome and impact level health indicators, limited attention has been paid to measuring processes pertaining to the performance of programs. In this paper, we assess the program reach and message exposure of a mobile health information messaging program for mothers (MomConnect) in South Africa. In this descriptive study, we draw from system generated data to measure exposure to the program through registration attempts and conversions, message delivery, opt-outs and drop-outs. Using a logit model, we additionally explore determinants for early registration, opt-outs and dropouts. From August 2014 to April 2017, 1 159 431 women were registered to MomConnect; corresponding to half of women attending antenatal care 1 (ANC1) and nearly 60% of those attending ANC1 estimated to own a mobile phone. In 2016, 26% of registrations started to get women onto MomConnect did not succeed. If registration attempts were converted to successful registrations, coverage of ANC1 attendees would have been 74% in 2016 and 86% in 2017. When considered as percentage of ANC1 attendees with access to a mobile phone, addressing conversion challenges bring registration coverage to an estimated 83%-89% in 2016 and 97%-100% in 2017. Among women registered, nearly 80% of expected short messaging service messages were received. While registration coverage and message delivery success rates exceed those observed for mobile messaging programs elsewhere, study findings highlight opportunities for program improvement and reinforce the need for rigorous and continuous monitoring of delivery systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere000583
JournalBMJ Global Health
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Prenatal Care
Telemedicine
South Africa
Mothers
Cell Phones
Text Messaging
Information Systems
Health Status
Logistic Models
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Unpacking the performance of a mobile health information messaging program for mothers (MomConnect) in South Africa : Evidence on program reach and messaging exposure. / Lefevre, Amnesty E; Dane, Pierre; Copley, Charles J.; Pienaar, Cara; Parsons, Annie Neo; Engelhard, Matt; Woods, David; Bekker, Marcha; Benjamin, Peter; Pillay, Yogan; Barron, Peter; Seebregts, Christopher John; Mohan, Diwakar.

In: BMJ Global Health, Vol. 3, e000583, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lefevre, AE, Dane, P, Copley, CJ, Pienaar, C, Parsons, AN, Engelhard, M, Woods, D, Bekker, M, Benjamin, P, Pillay, Y, Barron, P, Seebregts, CJ & Mohan, D 2018, 'Unpacking the performance of a mobile health information messaging program for mothers (MomConnect) in South Africa: Evidence on program reach and messaging exposure', BMJ Global Health, vol. 3, e000583. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjgh-2017-000583
Lefevre, Amnesty E ; Dane, Pierre ; Copley, Charles J. ; Pienaar, Cara ; Parsons, Annie Neo ; Engelhard, Matt ; Woods, David ; Bekker, Marcha ; Benjamin, Peter ; Pillay, Yogan ; Barron, Peter ; Seebregts, Christopher John ; Mohan, Diwakar. / Unpacking the performance of a mobile health information messaging program for mothers (MomConnect) in South Africa : Evidence on program reach and messaging exposure. In: BMJ Global Health. 2018 ; Vol. 3.
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