Understanding patient options, utilization patterns, and burdens associated with breast cancer screening

Susan Harvey, Ashok Vegesna, Sharon Mass, Janice Clarke, Alexandria Skoufalos

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Despite ongoing awareness, educational campaigns, and advances in technology, breast cancer screening remains a complex topic for women and for the health care system. Lack of consensus among organizations developing screening guidelines has caused confusion for patients and providers. The psychosocial factors related to breast cancer screening are not well understood. The prevailing algorithm for screening results in significant rates of patient recall for further diagnostic imaging or procedures, the majority of which rule out breast cancer rather than confirming it. For women, the consequences of the status quo range from unnecessary stress to additional out-of-pocket expenses to indirect costs that are more difficult to quantify. A more thoughtful approach to breast cancer screening, coupled with a research agenda that recognizes the indirect and intangible costs that women bear, is needed to improve cost and quality outcomes in this area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S3-S9
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume23
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

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Early Detection of Cancer
Breast Neoplasms
Costs and Cost Analysis
Confusion
Women's Rights
Women's Health
Diagnostic Imaging
Health Expenditures
Consensus
Organizations
Guidelines
Psychology
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Understanding patient options, utilization patterns, and burdens associated with breast cancer screening. / Harvey, Susan; Vegesna, Ashok; Mass, Sharon; Clarke, Janice; Skoufalos, Alexandria.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 23, 01.09.2014, p. S3-S9.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Harvey, Susan ; Vegesna, Ashok ; Mass, Sharon ; Clarke, Janice ; Skoufalos, Alexandria. / Understanding patient options, utilization patterns, and burdens associated with breast cancer screening. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2014 ; Vol. 23. pp. S3-S9.
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