Understanding Immigration as a Social Determinant of Health: Cardiovascular Disease in Hispanics/Latinos and South Asians in the United States

Jenny S. Guadamuz, Karan Kapoor, Mariana Lazo, Andrea Eleazar, Tamer Yahya, Alka M. Kanaya, Miguel Cainzos-Achirica, Usama Bilal

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose of Review: The main purpose of this review is to summarize the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors among two of the largest and most diverse immigrant groups in the United States (Hispanics/Latinos and South Asians). Recent Findings: While the migration process generates unique challenges for individuals, there is a wide heterogeneity in the characteristics of immigrant populations, both between and within regions of origin. Hispanic/Latino immigrants to the United States have lower levels of cardiovascular risk factors, prevalence, and mortality, but this assessment is limited by issues related to the “salmon bias.” South Asian immigrants to the United States generally have higher levels of risk factors and higher mortality. In both cases, levels of risk factors and mortality generally increase with time of living in the United States (US). Summary: While immigration acts as a social determinant of health, associations between immigration and cardiovascular disease and its risk factors are complex and vary across subpopulations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number25
JournalCurrent atherosclerosis reports
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Health disparities
  • Hispanics
  • Immigrant health
  • Latinos
  • South Asia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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