Understanding HIV/AIDS prevention and care in the context of competing health and well-being priorities among Black men who have sex with men in Baltimore, MD

Lauren Dayton, Karin Tobin, Carl Latkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines health and well-being priorities among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) in Baltimore, MD and their association with condom use. Among 148 sexually active BMSM, 43% were HIV positive. The majority ranked financial stability (68%), physical health (53%), and stable housing (59%) as top priorities. Fewer participants identified top priorities as mental health (37%), HIV prevention (35%), relationships with family (25%), and romantic partners (23%). Identifying HIV prevention (aOR: 2.25; 95% CI: 1.07-4.72) and relationship with family (aOR: 2.19; 95% CI: 0.99-4.89) as top priorities were associated with increased odds of always using condoms. Reporting stable housing as a top priority (aOR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.22-1.00) reduced the odds of always using a condom. To increase relevance, HIV/AIDS prevention programs should address BMSM’s financial, housing and physical health needs.

Keywords

  • BMSM
  • Competing Priorities
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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