Uncoupling translocation from translation: Implications for transport of proteins across membranes

Eve Perara, Richard Rothman, Vishwanath R. Lingappa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The segregation of secretory proteins into the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is normally tightly coupled to their synthesis. This feature distinguishes their biogenesis from that of proteins targeted to many other organelles. In the examples presented, translocation across the ER membrane is dissociated from translation. Transport, which is normally cotranslational, may proceed in the absence of chain elongation. Moreover, translocation across the ER membrane does not proceed spontaneously since, even in the absence of protein synthesis, energy substrates are required for translocation. These conclusions have been extended to the cotranslational integration of newly synthesized transmembrane proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-352
Number of pages5
JournalScience
Volume232
Issue number4748
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Membrane Transport Proteins
Endoplasmic Reticulum
Proteins
Membranes
Organelles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Uncoupling translocation from translation : Implications for transport of proteins across membranes. / Perara, Eve; Rothman, Richard; Lingappa, Vishwanath R.

In: Science, Vol. 232, No. 4748, 1986, p. 348-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perara, Eve ; Rothman, Richard ; Lingappa, Vishwanath R. / Uncoupling translocation from translation : Implications for transport of proteins across membranes. In: Science. 1986 ; Vol. 232, No. 4748. pp. 348-352.
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