Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Peripheral Nerve Stimulation: A Pragmatic Effectiveness Trial of a Nonpharmacologic Alternative for the Treatment of Postoperative Pain

Brian M. Ilfeld, Harold Gelfand, Sandeep Dhanjal, Robert Hackworth, Anthony Plunkett, Alparslan Turan, Alice M. Vijjeswarapu, Steven P. Cohen, James C. Eisenach, Scott Griffith, Steven Hanling, Edward J. Mascha, Daniel I. Sessler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) is an analgesic modality involving the insertion of a lead through an introducer needle followed by the delivery of electric current after needle withdrawal. This modality has been used extensively to treat chronic pain, but only small series have been published involving postoperative pain. The ultimate objective of this study is to determine the postoperative effects of percutaneous PNS following moderately to severely painful ambulatory surgery within a real-world clinical practice setting. The primary hypothesis is that surgical pain and opioid consumption during the initial 7 days after surgery will be reduced by percutaneous PNS compared with usual and customary analgesia (dual primary outcome measures). DESIGN: A multicenter pragmatic effectiveness trial. We are randomizing participants having painful orthopedic surgical procedures of the upper and lower extremity to receive 14 days of either 1) electrical stimulation or 2) sham in a double-masked fashion. End points are being assessed at various time points over 12 postoperative months. SUMMARY: The postoperative experience will be much improved if percutaneous PNS provides potent analgesia while concurrently decreasing opioid requirements following painful surgery. Because this modality can be administered for up to 60 days at home, it may provide postoperative analgesia that outlasts surgical pain yet has relatively few risks and, unlike opioids, has no systemic side effects or potential for abuse, addiction, and overdose. Percutaneous PNS has the potential to revolutionize postoperative analgesia as it has been practiced for the past century. This study will inform key stakeholders regarding an evidence-based nonpharmacologic approach to the management of postoperative pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S53-S61
JournalPain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 12 2020

Keywords

  • Neuromodulation
  • Percutaneous Peripheral Nerve Stimulation
  • Postoperative Analgesia
  • Postoperative Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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