Type of usual source of care and access to care

Leiyu Shi, Xiaoyu Nie, Tze Fang Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The goal of the study was to evaluate the association between types of usual source of care (USC) and access to care for people of different race/ethnicity and insurance coverage. Individuals reporting a doctor's office or health maintenance organization as a USC achieved the highest level of access. Individuals reporting a hospital emergency department as a USC were more likely to have access barriers and unmet needs. The independent effects of race/ethnicity were no longer significant after controlling for the type of USC and other factors. Insurance was a significant moderating factor on access to care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-221
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Ambulatory Care Management
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

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Insurance Coverage
Health Maintenance Organizations
Hospital Departments
Insurance
Hospital Emergency Service

Keywords

  • Access to care
  • Health insurance
  • Racial/ethnic disparities
  • Usual source of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Type of usual source of care and access to care. / Shi, Leiyu; Nie, Xiaoyu; Wang, Tze Fang.

In: Journal of Ambulatory Care Management, Vol. 36, No. 3, 07.2013, p. 209-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shi, Leiyu ; Nie, Xiaoyu ; Wang, Tze Fang. / Type of usual source of care and access to care. In: Journal of Ambulatory Care Management. 2013 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 209-221.
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