Type III acromioclavicular separation: rationale for anatomical reconstruction.

Adam J. Farber, Brett M. Cascio, John H Wilckens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Treatment of acute type III acromioclavicular separation is controversial. In some patients, nonoperative treatment is associated with pain, weakness, and stiffness. Many acromioclavicular joint reconstructions are associated with complications and results not substantially better than those of nonoperative treatment. Use of autogenous free tendon graft to anatomically reconstruct the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments offers several advantages over other surgical techniques. These advantages include improved biomechanical properties, no foreign body implantation, biological fixation, anatomical reconstruction, and early rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-355
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
Volume37
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Acromioclavicular Joint
Foreign Bodies
Ligaments
Tendons
Therapeutics
Rehabilitation
Transplants
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Type III acromioclavicular separation : rationale for anatomical reconstruction. / Farber, Adam J.; Cascio, Brett M.; Wilckens, John H.

In: American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.), Vol. 37, No. 7, 07.2008, p. 349-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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