Type i interferons: Crucial participants in disease amplification in autoimmunity

John C. Hall, Antony Rosen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A significant body of data implicates the type I interferon (IFN) pathway in the pathogenesis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In these disorders, a self-reinforcing cycle of IFN production can contribute to immunopathology through multiple mechanisms. Type I IFN cytokines are pleiotropic in their effects, mediating antiviral and antitumor activities, and possess numerous immunomodulatory functions for both the innate and adaptive immune responses. A key principle of the type I IFN system is rapid induction and amplification of the signaling pathway, which generates a feed-forward loop of IFN production, ensuring that a vigorous antiviral immune response is mounted. Although such feed-forward pathways are highly adaptive when it comes to rapid and effective virus eradication, this amplification can be maladaptive in immune responses directed against host tissues. Such feed-forward loops, however, create special opportunities for therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-49
Number of pages10
JournalNature Reviews Rheumatology
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

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Interferon Type I
Autoimmunity
Interferons
Antiviral Agents
Adaptive Immunity
Rheumatic Diseases
Innate Immunity
Autoimmune Diseases
Cytokines
Viruses
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Type i interferons : Crucial participants in disease amplification in autoimmunity. / Hall, John C.; Rosen, Antony.

In: Nature Reviews Rheumatology, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 40-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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